6 Do’s and Don’ts for New Music Teachers

By: Teaching Guitar Workshops

You’ve just been told to teach guitar and you quickly google, How many strings on a guitar?!! Sound like you? Whether you’re a newbie getting thrown into the pool (sink-or-swim style), or a classroom veteran, check out these do’s and don’ts for new music teachers!

 

LadyPhoto/iStock/Thinkstock
LadyPhoto/iStock/Thinkstock

 

1. Do: Find your Yoda

Every new teacher could use some tips from someone who’s seen and heard it all. Not only might a seasoned teacher have advice on how to manage your classroom, they might have some slam dunk lesson plans for you as well. If you don’t find a match at your school, find a virtual Yoda. Start participating and asking questions on sites like MusicTeachersHelper, NAfME’s Forums, or on the GuitarEduNet forum. If the question is guitar specific, reach out to Glen McCarthy – one of our trusted TGW Clinicians. Glen can’t help himself when it comes to talking about classroom guitar.

2. Don’t: Try to be buddies with your students

It’s true: Music teachers tend to be a pretty cool bunch. Often you’ll have the pleasure of teaching students who actually want to be in your class (a big deal, pre-college). The bottom line is, as a new teacher, you want to be liked. But don’t exert energy and class time trying to win your students over. Be who you are – funny, attentive, patient, innovative, etc. – and let the likes happen organically. It may take patience, but time is on your side.

3. Do: Tell students how your class will be different (and the same)

Something about having a new leader can trigger reticence in students. Get ahead of that by explaining, point by point, how your class will be different (and the same) as their previous classes. This way your students will know exactly what to expect.

4. Do: Optimize your teaching space

Just because you find your classroom arranged a certain way, doesn’t mean you’re (necessarily) stuck with it. Consider the number of students you’ll have, what instruments and equipment you’ll need, and the best way for you to lead and interact with your class. Next find out how much leeway you have in terms of rearranging, and plan a block of time to get it done. Even if you share the space, you’ll know exactly what needs to be done before each class. Think of it as a rehearsal.

5. Don’t: Expect things to go perfectly

Because they won’t. No matter how much preparation you do, and no matter how much energy and off-the-charts enthusiasm you bring, things will happen. Frustration will sideline some students. Students will come into class with personal issues. The countdown to Spring Break will happen. Big tests will loom. Ask what you can do, and when you’ve done it, give yourself a break.

6. Do: Get media-ready

Part of keeping your students’ attention for a full class will be making things dynamic. Whether you want students to take a listen to a song or chord progression, plug in, watch a film clip or record themselves playing, you’ll need to set yourself up with the right tech. Beg, borrow, and only when necessary, buy the media equipment you’ll need. When you have all that you’ll need in your space, your class can run without any interruptions.

Got advice or a story to tell, go to the comments down there.

 

Looking for additional resources? Attend a Teaching Guitar Workshop this summer!

Why? This Professional Development course is backed by the recommendations of thousands of school music educators who have studied with Teaching Guitar Workshops! Graduate credits and letters stating clock hours for teachers who need to get re-certified as part of their continuing education are included! Attendees also receive a stack of method books and sheet music, as well as lots of guitar accessories. 


 

 

 

This article originally appeared on www.guitaredunet.org.

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The National Association for Music Education (NAfME) provides a number of forums for the sharing of information and opinion, including blogs and postings on our website, articles and columns in our magazines and journals, and postings to our Amplify member portal. Unless specifically noted, the views expressed in these media do not necessarily represent the policy or views of the Association, its officers, or its employees.

 Kristen Rencher, Social Media Coordinator. March 30, 2015. © National Association for Music Education (NAfME.org)