2010 Research Poster Session III Abstracts – Part 1

2010 Biennial Music Educators National Conference Research Poster Session Abstracts

 

Research Poster Session IResearch Poster Session IIResearch Poster Session III
Part 1   •   Part 2Part 1   •   Part 2Part 1   •   Part 2

4:30 PM – 6:00 PM
Research Poster Session III

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Bauer, William I.; Case Western Reserve University. william.bauer@case.edu
“The Technological Pedagogical and Content Knowledge of Music Educators.”

Bergee, Martin; University of Kansas. mbergee@ku.edu
“An Application of Rasch Modeling to the Development of a Rhythm-reading Measure.”

Boucher, Helene; Academie Lavalloise. helene.boucher@mail.mcgill.ca
Charlene Ryan,Charlene Ryan; Assistant Professor, Berklee College of Music.
“Performance Stress and the Very Young Musician.”

Byo, James; Louisiana State University. jbyo@lsu.edu
Schlegel, Amanda; Louisiana State University.
Clark, N. Alan; Louisiana State University.
“Effects of Stimulus Octave and Timbre on Tuning Accuracy of Secondary School Instrumentalists.”

Cassidy, Jane; Louisiana State University. jcassid@lsu.edu
Schlegel, Amanda; Louisiana State University.
“Instrument Identification in a Melodic Context: Influence of Articulation and Pitch Register.”

Chee-Kang; University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. ckoh@illinois.edu
“Singaporean Adolescents’ Motivational Beliefs about School Music According to Gender and Extracurricular Music Participation.”

Custodero, Lori A.; Teachers College, Columbia University. lac66@columbia.edu
Stamou, Lelouda; University of Macedonia.
“The Challenge of Pedagogical Change: Guided Action Inquiry with Music Teachers in Greece.”

Dammers, Rick; Rowan University. dammers@rowan.edu
“A Case Study of the Creation of a Technology-Based Music Course.”

Daugherty, James F.; University of Kansas. jdaugher@ku.edu
Manternach, Jeremy N.; University of Kansas.
Price, Kathy K.; University of Kansas.
“Student Voice Use and Vocal Health During an All-State Chorus Event.”

Dekaney, Elisa M.; Syracuse University. emdekane@syr.edu
Robinson, Nicole R.; University of Memphis.
“A Comparison of Urban High School Students’ Perception of Music, Culture, and Identity.”

Droe, Kevin L.; University of Northern Iowa. droe@uni.edu
Galyen, S. Daniel; University of Northern Iowa.
“Preliminary examination of conductor verbal and nonverbal rehearsal behavior with an open or closed score.”

Garrett, Matthew L.; Case Western Reserve University. matthew.l.garrett@case.edu
“An Examination of Critical Thinking Skills in High School Choral Rehearsals.”

Hancock, Carl B.; The University of Alabama. carlbhancock@gmail.com
“Multivariate Analysis of Public and Private School Music Teachers Risk for Migration, Attrition, and Turnover.”

Hernly, Patrick; University of South Florida. phernly@mail.usf.edu
“Best Practices in World Music Ensemble Direction.”

Holmes, Alena; University of Wisconsin-Whitewater. holmesa@uww.edu
“Effect Of Fixed-Do And Movable-Do Solfege Instruction On The Development Of Sight-Singing Skills In 7- And 8-Year-Old Children.”

Huang, Yi-Ting; The Pennsylvania State University. yeh102@psu.edu
“Plain Living and Simple Deeds: The Role and Meaning of a Music Education in the Old Order Amish Community.”

Hunsaker, Tracy; Northeastern State University. hunsaker@nsuok.edu
“Processes and Criteria of Nationally Recognized High School Choral Directors for the Selection of Performance Literature.”

Johnson, Christopher; The University of Kansas. cmj@ku.edu
Madsen, Clifford; The Florida State University.
Geringer, John; The Florida State University.
“Study of Musicians’ Actual Rubato Manipulation: Mozart 1st Horn Concerto.”

Killian, Janice N.; Texas Tech University. janice.killian@ttu.edu
Satrom, Shauna L.; Pflugerville Independent School District.
“Retrospective Instrument Choices Among Middle School Band Members.”

 


 

Bauer, William I.; Case Western Reserve University. william.bauer@case.edu
“The Technological Pedagogical and Content Knowledge of Music Educators.”

Technological pedagogical and content knowledge (TPACK) is a model that provides a way to conceptualize how technology can be effectively integrated into teaching and learning. The purposes of this study were to (a) develop and administer an instrument to measure music educators’ technological pedagogical and content knowledge, (b) examine how music teachers acquire their TPACK, and (c) determine if a relationship existed between those teachers’ TPACK and their reported integration of technology. Participants (N = 190) were music teachers who completed two questionnaires, one designed to measure their TPACK (MTPACK-Q) and another to describe the level of technology integration in their classroom (CBAM-LoU). Scores on the technology-related domains of the TPACK model were lower than content, pedagogical, or pedagogical content domains. The top means of learning about three (technological content knowledge, technological pedagogical knowledge, and technological pedagogical and content knowledge) of the four TPACK domains that include technology was through self-exploration. This was also the second highest rated approach for the fourth domain that includes technology, technology knowledge. A moderate, significant correlation (r = .43, p < .01) was found between the teachers’ MTPACK-Q score and the level of technology integration in their classroom as reported by the CBAM-LoU.

Bergee, Martin; University of Kansas. mbergee@ku.edu
“An Application of Rasch Modeling to the Development of a Rhythm-reading Measure.”

The purpose of this study was to apply Rasch modeling to the development of a measure of rhythm reading achievement. I Rasch analyzed data collected from 26 college music education majors’ clapping performances of 78 rhythmic patterns in common time. The patterns systematically increased in difficulty. The data obtained were Rasch analyzed. Results led to the retention of 64 of the items, whose sequence of difficulty was largely but not entirely confirmed. Twelve of the items were removed because all participants performed them correctly. The other two were removed because their standardized infit (an index of fit) values (t) were beyond 2.0. Overall Rasch item reliability was .91, while Rasch person reliability was .96. Persons exhibited substantially more variability than did items. Five persons exhibited response patterns whose t values were beyond ±2.0. Diagnostics on selected individual items and persons were performed.

Boucher, Helene; Academie Lavalloise. helene.boucher@mail.mcgill.ca
Ryan, Charlene; Berklee College of Music.
“Performance Stress and the Very Young Musician.”

Performance anxiety is a common experience for many musicians. Its presence and effect on adult, student, and school-age musicians has been investigated in the literature, as have a variety of strategies for reducing its ill effects. The question as to its developed or innate nature led to the present inquiry pertaining to performance anxiety in young children. Sixty-six three- and four-year-olds taking group music lessons that culminated in two concerts served as participants. Self-report of anticipatory anxiety, cortisol secretion, and observation of anxious behaviors were the primary measures. Results indicate that young children do experience anxiety with respect to music performances and that responses seem to have both innate and developed origins. Children with prior performing experience reported less anticipatory anxiety, but higher cortisol levels, than those without prior experience. Performance location seemed to play a role in children’s anxiety response. Those who were familiar with their performance environment responded with less anxiety than those who were not familiar with the performance locale. Implications for music educators, and future research directions are discussed.

Byo, James; Louisiana State University. jbyo@lsu.edu
Schlegel, Amanda; Louisiana State University.
Clark, N. Alan; Louisiana State University.
“Effects of Stimulus Octave and Timbre on Tuning Accuracy of Secondary School Instrumentalists.”

To test the effect of octave and timbre on tuning accuracy, four stimuli—B-flat4 sounded by flute, oboe, and clarinet and B-flat2 sounded by tuba—functioned as reference pitches for high school wind players (N = 72). The two stimulus octaves combined with participants’ assigned tuning notes created soprano, tenor, and bass groups: All participants tuned to each instrument.
Results showed no effect due to tuning group. There was a significant difference due to stimulus. Deviation from the tuba stimulus (M = 9.05 cents) was significantly different from that of the oboe (M = 6.68), clarinet (M = 6.53), and flute (M = 5.74) stimuli, which were not significantly different from each other. There was no difference in the distribution of in-tune, sharp, and flat responses across tuning stimuli, a result that differs from the “preference for sharpness” effect in previous research. Verbal and performance responses to the tuba, oboe, and flute stimuli reveal misconceptions between participants’ perceptions of tuning difficulty and actual performance difficulty, and favor the use of oboe and flute as tuning references. Most of the participants (82%) reported tuning to the tuba as the prevalent approach to mass tuning in their school band.

Cassidy, Jane; Louisiana State University. jcassid@lsu.edu
Schlegel, Amanda; Louisiana State University.
“Instrument Identification in a Melodic Context: Influence of Articulation and Pitch Register.”

The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of articulation (initial attack) and register on music majors and non-majors ability to perceive and identify instrumental timbre in short melodic gestures. A CD stimulus was created using eight instrumental sounds: flute, oboe, clarinet, alto saxophone, trumpet, French horn, violin, and cello. Each instrumental timbre appeared four times on the CD: twice in a lower register and twice in a higher register — one of each included the initial attack, the other did not. The initial half second of the stimulus tones were removed to create the “no attack” tones. Participants, college music majors and non-music majors, listened to the CD and reported the name of the instrument they thought played on each sound file. Results indicate significant differences (p < .05) due to major (music students were more accurate than non-music students), register (melodic fragments in the higher register were more accurately identified than those in the low register), and some instruments were more readily identified than others. There was no significant difference due to the main effect of initial attack. A significant four-way interaction indicates that register made the most difference for horn, violin, and cello stimuli. Analysis of incorrect responses concluded that most distracters were instruments from the same family as the stimulus.

Chee-Kang; University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. ckoh@illinois.edu
“Singaporean Adolescents’ Motivational Beliefs about School Music According to Gender and Extracurricular Music Participation.”

An important aim of this study was to determine motivational beliefs of male and female extracurricular music students toward learning of school music as measured by motivational constructs derived from Eccles et al. (1983)’s expectancy-value theoretical framework. 1,710 students (891 boys, 819 girls) between Grade 6 to 8 from seven co-educational public schools (3 primary and 4 secondary schools) in the northern region of Singapore participated in the study, of which 289 (67 boys, 222 girls) indicated as participants of school-based extracurricular music activities. A web survey questionnaire asked participants: (a) about types of extracurricular music activities; (b) learned musical instruments in and outside of school; (c) motivational beliefs toward learning of school music based on six motivational constructs. Results show that gender stereotyping has directly impact on adolescents’ preference of learned musical instruments and selection of extracurricular music activities. Significant differences were found between boys and girls on their perceived difficulty and self-competence of school music. In general, both boys and girls expressed high motivation in learning school music. Girls’ motivation, however, declined over the primary-secondary transition whilst boys exhibited an upward trend. The results help to frame how music is perceived by extracurricular music students as a school subject and suggest a need to enhance motivation of these musical talents, particular girls, through various programs, structures and processes. Another implication is the need to provide access and opportunity for both boys and girls to have a wider choice in selecting extracurricular music activities and musical instruments.

Custodero, Lori A.; Teachers College, Columbia University. lac66@columbia.edu
Stamou, Lelouda; University of Macedonia.
“The Challenge of Pedagogical Change: Guided Action Inquiry with Music Teachers in Greece.”

Using flow experience as a paradigm for professional development, and flow indicators as tools to implement appropriately challenging activities, 28 music teachers in Greece took part in an action inquiry study over the course of 3 weeks. Teachers were introduced to indicators of flow experience, paired with research partner who shared a similar teaching setting, and asked to observe a target group of students for these indicators, and to design, implement (and videotape) and reflect on a lesson meant to elicit flow in the students. Lessons were videotaped and shared. In this presentation, we address the findings of this research regarding issues of Greek teacher experience and the potential for pedagogical change. Data included drawings of their teaching setting, a teaching questionnaire, and interviews. Examining self-reports of classroom and studio experiences revealed three categories of “problematizing” evident in participants’ past and present reflections on and in action. Key themes of teacher experience were expressed in an orientation to the students (inside-outside and high-low), in issues of freedom and control (agency), and of mutuality. The opportunity to observe and reflect with others about their teaching approach and content in specific ways provided a catalyst for self-discovery: It was by focusing on their students’ behaviours as sources of information, that these change around music teaching practices could be contemplated.

Daugherty, James F.; University of Kansas. jdaugher@ku.edu
Manternach, Jeremy N.; University of Kansas.
Price, Kathy K.; University of Kansas.
“Student Voice Use and Vocal Health During an All-State Chorus Event.”

This field-based case study documented students’ (N=256) voice use and responses to vocal health indicator statements during a 3-day all-state high school chorus event through: (a) daily surveys; (b) phonation duration data; (c) analysis of rehearsal voice use behaviors; and (d) field notes.
Among primary results: (a) first and final day survey comparisons indicated significant, deteriorating changes in 5 of 7 voice health indicator statements and self-perceptions of singing voice quality; yet (b) most students (78.8%) believed they had taken good care of their voices; (c) self-reported sleep hours decreased significantly; (d) phonation time doses acquired by two students typically ranged from 15-37 % (M=22.75%) during rehearsal periods, 12-27 % (M=18.56 %) during most event non-rehearsal times, and 3-17% (M=9.24%) during measured pre- and post-event activities; (e) cumulative acquired vibratory cycle doses ranged from 5.5 million -7.5 million cycles; (f) afforded voice rest time (ca. 63%) exceeded voice use time (ca. 37%) during rehearsals; (g) students sat, rather than stood, for approximately 73% of rehearsal time; and (h) two compositions ranked highest relative to demands on adolescent voices consumed 61% of rehearsal time.
Results were discussed in terms of voice care education, potential schedule refinements, and suggestions for further study.

Dekaney, Elisa M.; Syracuse University. emdekane@syr.edu
Robinson, Nicole R.; University of Memphis.
“A Comparison of Urban High School Students’ Perception of Music, Culture, and Identity.”

Forty students (N=40) enrolled in the world drumming classes at two mid-size urban high schools, School A (n=18) and School B (n=22), responded to a survey in which they freely responded to questions about their music preference, cultural background, school environment, their involvement in music in their schools and community, and how they believe their music choices express their identities. Results revealed that students in School A, where teachers and administrators seemed to have adopted culturally relevant pedagogies, expressed in a more meaningful and articulate way their perceptions of music, culture, and identity.

Dammers, Rick; Rowan University. dammers@rowan.edu
“A Case Study of the Creation of a Technology-Based Music Course.”

This study examines the process, motivations and conditions surrounding the creation of a high school music technology class. The process was initiated by Steve, the school’s band director, who wanted to reach a broader portion of the school’s population. The process was facilitated by Diana, the district’s assistant superintendent who believed in technology’s ability to engage students and in the importance of the arts in education. While Steve was able to address the pre-requisite concerns of scheduling and space, Diana was able to provide monetary support through external grant funding. This study confirms and clarifies that technology-based music classes are being created by individual teachers who believe that technology provides an opportunity to reach a new population of secondary students.

Droe, Kevin L.; University of Northern Iowa. droe@uni.edu
Galyen, S. Daniel; University of Northern Iowa.
“Preliminary examination of conductor verbal and nonverbal rehearsal behavior with an open or closed score.”

The purpose of this study was to conduct a preliminary examination of verbal and nonverbal teaching behaviors of a conductor during a rehearsal with an open or closed score. Participants included eight middle school or junior high conductors. During four rehearsals, conductors were asked to select one of their current works and rehearse it with their score open for five minutes and with their score closed for five minutes. Verbal dependent variables of observation included verbal approvals and disapprovals, conceptual teaching behaviors, performance target areas and teacher talk time. Nonverbal dependent variables included nonverbal approvals and disapprovals and teacher eye contact to ensemble or students. Following the treatment period, conductors completed a questionnaire to evaluate attitude and comfort level of the procedure. Descriptive statistics of this sample of conductors were reported and observable differences between the two conditions included conductors talking more and making more conceptual teaching comments when their score was closed. Suggestions for procedure modifications are discussed.

Garrett, Matthew L.; Case Western Reserve University. matthew.l.garrett@case.edu
“An Examination of Critical Thinking Skills in High School Choral Rehearsals.”

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between time spent in nonperformance and critical thinking activities in high school choral rehearsals. Participants included three high school chorus directors identified as master teachers using specific criteria. Three 15-minute unscripted video rehearsal samples were collected from one beginning level and one advanced choir from each participant’s school at approximately the mid-point of performance preparation. Observed rehearsal behaviors were coded into three categories of nonperformance activity: lower order thinking, critical thinking, and nonspecific activity. Anderson and Krathwohl’s revision of Bloom’s taxonomy (2001) served as the basis for defining lower order cognitive processes (remember, understand, apply) and processes used in critical thinking (analyze, evaluate, create).
Results indicated the mean rehearsal time spent in all nonperformance activities was 53.89%, with 45.96% focused on lower order thinking skills, 6.36% in critical thinking skills, and 1.57% in nonspecific activities including off-task behavior and silence. A significant positive correlation was found between the amount of time spent in nonperformance activities and time spent engaged in critical thinking skills. The relationship between students’ level of school music experience, as evidenced by a tiered choir system (beginning level to advanced) and the percentage of time spent developing students’ critical thinking skills was also examined. However, no significant correlation was found. Findings suggest that amount of time spent using critical thinking skills in high school choral rehearsals may be influenced by a variety of factors, including rehearsal techniques, learning objectives, and pedagogical skills exhibited by master teachers.

Hancock, Carl B.; The University of Alabama. carlbhancock@gmail.com
“Multivariate Analysis of Public and Private School Music Teachers Risk for Migration, Attrition, and Turnover.”

This study examines the effect of several predictors of teacher turnover on music teachers’ risk for migration, attrition, and turnover. Data from a nationally representative sample of 1,969 public and private school music teachers in the United States served as subjects. The aim of the study was to extend a previous investigation of music teacher turnover which viewed turnover as a dichotomy by examining the extent the predictors affected music teachers’ risk for migration, attrition, and both attrition/migration. Analysis utilized direct multinomial logistic regression to determine significant predictors of the three risk categories. Results indicate that statistically significant predictors generally differed among the four classifications. Only years of teaching experience and satisfaction with salary were significant predictors for all risk categories. Moreover, predictors for attrition and attrition/migration risk differed. Implications for understanding the turnover of music teachers are discussed.

Hernly, Patrick; University of South Florida. phernly@mail.usf.edu
“Best Practices in World Music Ensemble Direction.”

College world music ensemble direction has become an important topic in music education. The wide variety of world music ensemble types now ensconced in many American universities is a testament to the growing popularity of world music ensembles, for music majors and non-majors alike. The directors for these world music ensembles come from a variety of educational backgrounds, experiences, and levels of expertise with regard to the musics and cultures of their ensembles. The purpose of this exploratory study was to examine practical teaching strategies utilized by two successful college world music ensemble directors in addressing issues relating to world music ensemble direction. Two successful college world music ensemble directors, a steel band director and a tabla ensemble director, were interviewed using a protocol that featured questions based on relevant literature from ethnomusicology and multicultural music education. This study found that philosophical issues relevant to world music ensemble direction were grouped into three main categories: (a) the world music ensembles, (b) the ensemble directors, and (c) the host institutions of their ensembles. Findings of this study suggest that directors of college world music ensembles face many of the same issues as those of Western canonic ensembles. However, the world music ensemble directors need to deal with additional philosophical and practical issues relating to culture and representation. For further research, the researcher suggested revisions to the interview instrument.

Holmes, Alena; University of Wisconsin-Whitewater. holmesa@uww.edu
“Effect Of Fixed-Do And Movable-Do Solfege Instruction On The Development Of Sight-Singing Skills In 7- And 8-Year-Old Children.”

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of movable-do and fixed-do solfege instruction on the development of sight-singing skills of 7- and 8-year-old children. Participants (N=181) for this study were students from 12 second grade classes in north central Florida. Students in the experimental groups received solfege instruction for 10 sessions of general music classes, each 20 minutes in length. During the treatment period two different approaches to the solfege instruction were used: (1) movable–do instructional approach, which was based on Conversational Solfege method developed by John Feierabend; and (2) fixed-do approach to the instruction based on Russian solfege textbooks by Frolova and Metallidi and Pertcovskaya.
The children were individually tested for sight-singing performance and singing voice development prior to the instruction and then again after the completion of 10 sessions.
Results revealed a significant improvement in sight-singing achievement for both experimental groups. Children who participated in movable-do solfege instruction demonstrated highest scores on the post-tests and greatest gain in sight-singing achievement. MANCOVA test for total score on sight-singing post-tests revealed a significant effect for the pedagogical approach (F = 4.24, df = 2, 176, p < 0.05), school (F = 13.98, df = 3, 176, p < 0.001), Singing Voice Development Measure pre-test (F = 6.86, df = 6, 176, p < 0.001) and scores on sight-singing pre-test (F = 21.63, df = 1, 176, p < 0.001). Multiple regression procedures revealed that the number of solfege sessions (p < 0.001), the level of Singing Voice Development (p < 0.001) and scores on sight-singing pre-test (p < 0.001) were significant predictors of scores on sight-singing post-test. Tukey Pairwise Comparisons among pedagogical approaches yielded significant mean differences (p < 0.01) between movable-do and fixed-do pedagogy.

Huang, Yi-Ting; The Pennsylvania State University. yeh102@psu.edu
“Plain Living and Simple Deeds:The Role and Meaning of a Music Education in the Old Order Amish Community.”

The Amish are known for their simple living, plain dress, and resistance of modern conveniences. Amish schools often incorporate musical activities for children. However, there are few research studies regarding music education in the Amish schools, and the access into Amish educational communities has been limited by the Amish. In view of a need to gain understanding on music education in Amish schools, this study aims at further exploring the role and meaning of a music education in the Old Order Amish Community.
The purpose of this study was to investigate the cultural meanings and music transmission processes through the lived experience of an Amish school teacher. The guiding questions focused on: (1) how does music transmission take place in an Amish school? (2) what are the cultural meanings associated with music learning in this setting? (3) what are the musical and cultural expectations for students’ development through musical doing?
This was a qualitative single-case design and this study gathered data through interviews at three separate times as the teacher prepared her class for a Christmas Program. The conclusions indicate that music transmission in the Amish school reflected the value system preserved by the closed community, students’ participation in singing and obedience to traditional Amish customs were expected, and the teacher played a dominant role during the music transmission in the classroom.

Hunsaker, Tracy; Northeastern State University. hunsaker@nsuok.edu
“Processes and Criteria of Nationally Recognized High School Choral Directors for the Selection of Performance Literature.”

This study investigated and described the choral literature selection processes and criteria of “successful” public high school teachers. “Successful” was defined as being nationally recognized by performing at a national American Choral Directors Association (ACDA) convention. Participants consisted of 11 high school choral directors who performed with their choral ensembles at one or more national ACDA conventions held in 1999, 2001, 2003, and 2005. Participants were interviewed. Interviews were tape-recorded, transcribed, and analyzed. Analysis revealed what philosophy guides directors’ choices; where and how directors acquired their selection knowledge; sources used for selection ideas and exposure to new literature; specific selection criteria; festival literature influences; literature cataloguing practices; and concert programming processes and their influences on selection.
Although most of the directors interviewed taught at what would be considered large to very large high schools, the processes and criteria they follow in the selection of choral performance literature should be of interest to high school choral directors at any school. Each director conveyed information which was unique to that director, and each director also conveyed information which was similar to most if not all of the other directors. The directors taught in varied communities, and their processes and criteria reflect both the directors’ backgrounds and their consideration to the programs and communities in which they taught. The findings from this study could be used by other high school choral directors to apply and try out the ideas presented by these “successful” choral directors in their own selection of performance literature.

Johnson, Christopher; The University of Kansas. cmj@ku.edu
Madsen, Clifford; The Florida State University.
Geringer, John; The Florida State University.
“Study of Musicians’ Actual Rubato Manipulation: Mozart 1st Horn Concerto.”

The purpose of the present investigation was to analyze the mean of thirty performances of an excerpt from the Mozart Concerto Number 1 in D Major for Horn and Orchestra, and compare the patterns found to tendencies found in previous investigation using the Mozart Concerto Number 2 in Eb Major for Horn and Orchestra. Data were collected directly from subjects’ digital readouts of the Continuous Response Digital Interface (CRDI) dial movement which actually controlled the speed of the soloist’s performance. Timings were analyzed and compared to previously identified tendencies. Some tendencies from previous performances were found to be replicated. Overall performances, however, more closely reflected the previous performances of the less proficient horn performers than those of the highest caliber performers (Johnson, 1996b; 1999.)

Killian, Janice N.; Texas Tech University. janice.killian@ttu.edu
Satrom, Shauna L.; Pflugerville Independent School District.
“Retrospective Instrument Choices Among Middle School Band Members.”

In our ongoing examination of student instrument choices, we asked 268 band members (grade 6 = 108, grade 7 = 92, grade 8 = 88 representing 139 males and 129 females) to list the instrument they were currently playing , their second favorite instrument, why they chose those instruments, and to rate how well they liked their chosen instruments on a 1-7 scale. Responses were divided into emerging themes: Characteristics of the Instrument (the way the instrument sounds, looks, ease of playing, styles played [1st instrument choice = 128; 2nd instrument choice = 148]); Influence of Others (family, director, friends [1st =77, 2nd = 27]); Comments About Self [audition successes, challenge of learning new things, always wanted to play, desire to be member of a select group [1st = 63, 2nd = 36]); Generalized Positive (fun, cool, favorite [1st = 35; 2nd =35]). No answer or Indecipherable (1st =15; 2nd = 35). Likert scales of preference for selected instruments revealed that students rated their 1st instruments significantly higher than their 2nd; grade 6 selected significantly higher ratings than grades 7 and 8; and there were no significant differences by gender. Comparison of first and second instrument choices revealed that 54.69% of females and 72.99% of males changed instrument families. Results are discussed in terms of application for music education practitioners as well as implications for future research.