NAfME Online Professional Learning Community

LIVE Webinar Schedule Webinar Recordings

Through NAfME’s Professional Learning and Partnerships Committee (PLPC), societies, councils, and other programs/outreach efforts (for advocacy, etc.), and the active participation of members submitting presentation proposals, NAfME provides a variety of webinars for members throughout the year. Selected programming is available for members and nonmembers.

SEE BELOW for upcoming webinars, recent webinars, and other recordings

The PLPC has an open call for webinar proposals throughout the year:

  • Each proposal as well as the submitter’s short video and presentation slides will be reviewed by the PLPC.
  • Prior to submitting, write an engaging, copy-edited title and overview description with learning objectives for your proposal. You will also need to submit short bios for all presenters.
  • To expedite the review process, the committee requests that at the time you submit your proposal, you also attach an advanced draft of your presentation slides and include a link to a 1- to 2-minute video providing a brief recap of the proposed webinar (key areas covered and why the topic is important). Prepare those items prior to submitting the online form below.
  • When your are ready, click here to submit your proposal using the online submission form!
  • If you a question about NAfME webinars, please contact John Donaldson (johnd@nafme.org).

Click here to access selected webinars provided by NAfME corporate members. Currently the following programs are available:

  • Design Considerations for Secondary School Music Facilities (Wenger Corporation)

  • Culturally Responsive Teaching (Longy School of Music)

NAfME LIVE Webinar Schedule

Live webinar attendance is limited. Attendees will be added to the webinar on a first-come, first-served basis. Recordings will be made available for registrants the day after the live event.

 

  • UPCOMING WEBINARS

 

Council for Jazz Education Town Hall:  Building Your Jazz Program at Any Level and Q&A!

Monday, November 14, 2022 – 7:00 to 8:00 pm

If you are a NAfME member and would like to view this program, contact johnd@nafme.org. 

Please join Dr. Roosevelt Griffin, Dr. Lenora Helm Hammonds, and Ms. Bethany Robinson from the Jazz Council as they discuss ways to build jazz programs from 5–12th grade and university perspective- including instrumental and vocals programs! Bring your questions to collaborate with our presenters during the second half of the Town Hall. 

Roosevelt Griffin III, Ed. D. is an award-winning educator with international acclaim for excellence in music education. He serves as the Walter Dyett Chair for Jazz Studies Diversity and Inclusion at VanderCook College of Music and is the Founder and CEO of the Griffin Institute of Performing Arts NFP. Dr. Griffin is the Jazz Education Network and Berklee College of Music’s 2022 John LaPorta Jazz Educator of the Year and is one of the nation’s most sought-after clinicians. He is most noted for his work with elementary and middle school band programs. He is also esteemed for his ability to transform classrooms and communities through building valuable relationships, effective pedagogy, and his dedication to musical excellence. His passion for building sustainable music programs and teaching in underserved communities has been highlighted in national and international publications. 

Bethany Robinson 11-14-22

Bethany Robinson is a Yamaha Performing Artist, 2022 Grammy Music Educator Award Finalist, Chair for the National Association for Music Education Jazz Council, President of the Indiana Jazz Educators Association, and serves on the Jazz Education Network Board. She is the Jazz Band Director for Noblesville Schools in Noblesville, Indiana. Robinson was named 2014 Indiana Jazz Educator of the Year, 2015 Noblesville Teacher of the Year, a 2016 Indiana Teacher of the Year Semi-Finalist and named a 2022 Jazz Hero by the Jazz Journalists Association. She helps lead the annual Indiana Jazz Girls Day, was a keynote speaker for the 2021 Australia National Band and Orchestra Conference, a presenter for the 2021 Indiana Music Educator Association Conference and will present at the 2021 International Midwest Band and Orchestra Clinic in Chicago. She is an avid clinician, adjudicator, and performer on upright bass, electric bass, and vocals.

Dr. Lenora Z. Helm Hammonds is a Chicago IL native, Former U.S. Jazz Ambassador two-time Fulbright Senior Music Specialist, and a tenured, Associate Professor in the Department of Music and Jazz Studies Program at North Carolina Central University (NCCU). She is Interim Chair for the Department of Music and Director of Graduate Programs, Jazz Studies. She teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in vocal jazz performance, jazz ear training, jazz pedagogy and songwriting, and is Director of NCCU Vocal Jazz Ensemble. Dr. Hammonds has authored several academic and student initiatives, including the planning, design, and coordination of an NEA-sponsored Teaching Artist Certificate program. The inaugural recipient of the 2022 Jazz Educator of Distinction award from Jazz Music Awards foundation, her academic award highlights include a Duke University-NCCU John Hope Franklin Digital Humanities Fellowship, 2018 Javett Music Award International Jazz Scholar at University of Pretoria, South Africa, a 2018 Lifetime Achievement Award from Marquis Publishing, NCCU’s Excellence in Teaching Award, and receiving the highest faculty honor, the 2021 University of North Carolina Board of Governors Excellence in Teaching Award. Lenora’s dream for creating access to under-served global populations interested in vocal jazz education was realized in the creation of a library of online vocal training programs at www.LenoraHelm.online. She earned a Bachelor of Music in Film Scoring and Voice from Berklee College of Music, a Master of Music, Jazz Performance from East Carolina University, and a Doctor of Musical Arts in Music Education from Boston University. Her research interests are at the intersection of digital humanities, intercultural competence, and Jazz, and is a published author with Routledge, Taylor & Francis, and Springer. Her achievements in academia are in addition to more than three decades as a recording artist. P/K/A Lenora Zenzalai Helm, she is acclaimed as a jazz vocalist, vocal musicianship coach, lyricist, composer, arranger, and big band bandleader.

 

Lifting Up Voices and Narratives of the AAPI Community in the Greater Educational Orchestra and Strings Landscape

Wednesday, November 16, 2022 – 7:00 to 8:00 PM Eastern

If you would like to view this program, click here to access NAfME’s DEIA web page (under Webinar Resources)

Hear from and converse with a panel of experts from opposite ends of the US representing many facets of the Educational Orchestra and Strings Landscape who will share stories, thoughts, and hopes and dreams centered on fostering understanding about the diversity within the Asian American Pacific Islander (AAPI) community, and moving music education forward by creating learning and learning spaces that are reflective of and uplifting to the communities that are present.  Organized by NAfME’s Council for Orchestral Education, this session is open to all. Participants will come away with new knowledge and ideas for building culturally inclusive curricula and programming. 

Randy Wong – Hawaii-born and raised, Randy Wong (he/him) is a distinctive voice within the arts administration and musical communities, and one of few Asian American executive directors out of hundreds of orchestras nationwide. Randy joined Hawaii Youth Symphony (HYS) as its Executive Director in 2012 and became its President in 2017, and is its first leader to be an alumnus, musician, and educator.

Hawaii Youth Symphony is a nonprofit organization founded in 1964 with a mission to develop youth to their fullest potential through orchestral music, in the context of Hawaii’s unique cultures. HYS serves over 700 youth ages 7-18 across the Hawaiian islands, through over 15 symphonic, string, jazz, ukulele, and general music ensembles. Randy oversees all of Hawaii Youth Symphony’s strategic, administrative, artistic, educational, and community pursuits and its Pacific Music Institute. HYS’ aspirational vision is to Make Music A Right, in pursuit of a future where children of all backgrounds can play an instrument and an ensemble. 

Outside of HYS, Randy performs professionally with the Hawaii Symphony Orchestra as a section bassist, and has numerous side projects. Randy holds an Ed. M from the Harvard Graduate School of Education (Arts in Education) and a B.M. (Performance) from New England Conservatory. 

Alice Tsui (pronounced TSOY) is an Asian American/Chinese American pianist, Grammy-nominated music educator, scholar, activist, dog mom, and lifelong Brooklyn, New Yorker! Alice is the Founding Music Teacher and Arts Coordinator at PS 532 New Bridges Elementary, an arts-integrated public elementary school in Crown Heights, Brooklyn. She graduated from New York University with a Bachelor of Music in Piano Performance and a Master of Arts in Music Education, and is currently a doctoral candidate (ABD) in music education at Boston University. Alice is an adjunct lecturer at CUNY Queens College Aaron Copland School of Music. Alice is an active national presenter and facilitator, including for professional development with Carnegie Hall, NYC Department of Education Citywide Professional Learning, and the National Association for Music Education Connected Arts Network. Alice serves on the boards of the Association of Popular Music Education and F-flat Books. As a product of the NYC public school system, Alice is passionate about decolonizing, ABAR (anti-bias, anti-racist), and abolitionist public music education. Alice aims to empower the individual and collective voices of youth through music as expression. Learn more about Alice at http://www.alicetsui.com and http://www.instagram.com/musicwithmissalice.

Duane Padilla – After earning degrees from Northwestern University and Yale University, concert artist and educator, Duane Padilla began his performance career as an orchestral musician, performing with the National Repertoire Orchestra, the Tanglewood Music Center Orchestra, the New Haven Symphony, and the Honolulu Symphony Orchestra.  Also an active classical chamber music performer, his ensemble The Gemini Duo was a semi-finalist in the prestigious International Concert Artists Guild Competition in NYC, and earned outreach grants from Chamber Music America and the American Federation of Musicians and was a featured ensemble on the Connecticut Commission on the Arts Performing Artist Roster and the CMA Rural Residency Artist Roster. Duane’s more recent artistic endeavors have turned towards jazz. As a founding member of The Hot Club of Hulaville, he won the Hawaii Academy of Recording Arts’s award for jazz album of the year for their gypsy jazz release “Django Would Go!”. His subsequent solo jazz violin album “Sentimental Swing” was named one of the top 40 jazz releases of 2011 by the South African Jazz Educators Association.  Recent concert collaborations include duo performances with Pianist Tommy James (Music Director of the Duke Ellington Orchestra NYC), fingerstlye guitar legend Jeff Linsky, Guitarist Paul Mehling (Hot Club of San Francisco), Grammy winning Hawaiian Slack Key Guitarist Jeff Peterson, and Jazz Ukulele Grand Master Ben Chong and ukulele superstar Jake Shimabukuro. He has opened concerts for jazz giants Martin Taylor, John Jorgensen, and John Pizzarelli. He currently performs with the Mana Music Quartet whose recent album “Queen Lili’uokalani” was named Instrumental Album of the year by the Hawaii Academy of Recording Arts. 

An equally accomplished educator, Duane studied Suzuki violin pedagogy with Betty Haig, Lisa Hershumgel, Stevie Svenden, Teri Einfeld, Alan Lieb as well as Rolland/Zweig Pedagogy with Stacia Spencer. He has studied conducting with Marvin Rabin, William Jones &  Shinick Hahm. He has studied jazz violin with Tim Kliphuis, Ben Powell, and Aaron Weinstein, Jason Anick and Christian Howes. Duane began his teaching career in Connecticut where he was head of the Suzuki Program at the Tabor Community Arts Center and the Bethwood Suzuki School. While in Connecticut, he also designed and implemented a unique public school string program for grades 1-3 based on the Suzuki violin method for Wintergreen Magnet School.  He has served as President of the Hawaii Chapter of the American String Teachers Association and has also served on the Board of Directors of the Suzuki Association of Hawaii and the Suzuki Talent Education of Hawaii After serving on the National Board of the American String Teacher’s Association as Chair of the American String Teachers Association’s Eclectic Styles Committee he served ASTA as an Executive Board Member as Member At Large and is currently Chair of the Content Committee.  He currently is on faculty at the Punahou Music School and Chaminade University.

LaSaundra Booth is a National Board Certified teaching artist, inventor, author, conductor, and arts administrator. Booth was named one of 50 Directors who Make A Difference by School Band and Orchestra Magazine. She has 20 years experience teaching and conducting orchestra at the elementary, middle, high, and collegiate level.  All of her performing ensembles received superior ratings in adjudicated music festivals and competitions. 

Booth has a certificate in nonprofit management from Duke University, a doctorate degree in Educational Leadership, a Master’s Degree in Music Education from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, and a Bachelor of Music from North Carolina Central University. She studied with Dr. Timothy Holley, Alex Ezerman, Jesse L. Suggs, Jr., Kellie Keiser, and Jennifer Wernicke. Booth serves as lecturer of music education at the University of North Carolina- Chapel Hill.  Booth previously served as Director of Strings at Winston-Salem State University, a historically black university in Winston-Salem, N.C. 

Booth is an alumni of  Sphinx LEAD (Leaders in Excellence, Arts & Diversity), who is known for anchoring discussions on how to make public school orchestra programs more equitable, diverse, and inclusive to all students.  Booth has a successful history of establishing diverse, equitable, and inclusive programs at the elementary, middle, high school, and collegiate levels. She founded the Wake Forest Community Youth Orchestra (2013), a non-profit organization that provides expert orchestral instruction and free instruments to youth where orchestra opportunities are limited or do not exist. In her tenure, Booth has grown the organization from 3 students to over 350 Pre-K through 12th grade students across Wake, Franklin, and Vance counties. In April 2021, Booth received the Vance County Champion of the Arts Award for bringing the first after-school string program to the district. 

Booth is in demand as a cellist and conductor. She has performed with Integrity Strings, Cellist Ti Awo, Colour of Music Symphony Orchestra, Greensboro Philharmonia, Raleigh Symphony, Duke Symphony, and Durham Symphony. Her most recent appointments include guest conductor of the Intercollegiate Music Association’s String Orchestra (IMA), conductor of NAfME’s All-National Honors Symphony Orchestra, guest clinician for the California Orchestra Director Association (CODA 2022) and Washoe County School District High School Honors Orchestra in Reno, NV (2022). Dr. Booth most recently served as the Chamber Orchestra conductor for  Youth Orchestra of Los Angeles(YOLA) National Festival. Dr. Booth is the first woman of color to have conducted both the NAfME All-National Symphony as well as YOLA’s National Festival. Her programming features the music of BIPOC composers, including women and living composers.  

Elizabeth Fortune is a change-agent in music education. She is the Director of Education for the Wintergrass Festival, a nonprofit organization that hosts a nationally acclaimed acoustic music festival with award-nominated educational programming every February in Bellevue, WA; and the chairperson for the National Association for Music Education Council for Orchestral Education.  She is also the co-host of a popular forward-thinking music education podcast/ Facebook Live show called “The Beth and Kelly Show.”  She is a veteran classroom instrumental music educator. From 2018-2022, she was the Director of Orchestras at Seattle’s Ballard High School.  From  2002-2018, she was the Director of Orchestras and Jazz Strings at Seattle’s Washington Middle School. 

Fortune is driven by the desire to transform music education by helping students and colleagues acquire an intrinsic ownership of the Artistic Process through Courageous Collaboration. No stone is left unturned in the work she is doing in all areas of music education to empower students and educators to see themselves as artists, musical decision makers, and lovers of music. 

 

Additional programming will be announced here as it becomes available.

Visit NAfME’s events page to see additional upcoming events.

 

  • RECENT WEBINARS

 

General Music Town Hall: Calling All General Music Teachers!

October 24, 2022 – 7:00 pm to 8:00 pm EDT

Join members of the NAfME Council for General Music Education and other general music educators from throughout the country as we compare notes, network, build community, discuss challenges, and share what is working well so far in the 2022-2023 school year. Bring your questions, ideas, and issues you want to discuss!

Please note that to provide participants with an opportunity to have the best possible open discussion this event was not recorded.

Cultivating and Fostering a Classroom Culture of Your Design

October 19, 2022 – 7:00 pm to 8:00 pm Eastern

If you are a NAfME member and would like to view this program, contact johnd@nafme.org. 

How do you want your classroom to feel, and how do your students contribute to that feeling? While many younger music educators feel comfortable with our content area, establishing a positive learning environment is often an area for growth. This interactive webinar will focus on cultivating and fostering a classroom culture of your design. Attendees will first start by reflecting on their current classroom culture, and defining goals on how they’d like for it to be. Then, we will discuss ways to foster this positive environment through daily actions. An emphasis will be placed on ensuring the inclusiveness of all learners.

Hosts include Tyler Ehrlich (DMA student in Wind Conducting at The University of Texas at Austin, former Director of Bands at Decatur (Ga.) High School), and Jonathan Grantham (Director of Bands at Amador Valley (Calif.) High School.) The clinicians have combined nearly thirty years of experience teaching secondary music, and have frequently collaborated in the past to improve their own classroom environments. They are looking forward to sharing the fruits of their friendship with attendees.

In this session, participants will:

  • Understand the importance of establishing an inclusive classroom culture
  • Reflect on the current environment of their classroom (pre-service educators will use a collegiate ensemble or class)
  • Define a vision for their ideal classroom culture
  • Discuss strategies for including student voice in defining classroom culture and in your teaching practice
  • Exit with resources to further develop their classroom culture (books on successful organizations, habit building, and more)

Tyler Ehrlich (he/him) serves as a graduate teaching assistant and doctoral student in wind conducting at The University of Texas at Austin. In this role, he assists with the conducting and administration of the university’s concert bands, athletic bands, and conducting courses. Ehrlich previously lived in Atlanta, Georgia where he served as director of bands at Decatur High School and conductor of the Emory University Wind Ensemble. He holds degrees from the University of Georgia and Cornell University. Tyler resides with his partner, Dr. Brent Allman, and their dog Milo. Tyler’s website is http://tylerehrlich.com.

Jonathan Grantham, director of bands at Amador Valley High School in Pleasanton, California, leads a band program of 300 students involved in five concert ensembles, three jazz bands, a competitive marching band, various chamber ensembles, two winter percussion units, and two winter guards. Mr. Grantham maintains an active music education blog, The Accidental Expert, and enjoys mentoring new teachers. He resides in Martinez, California with his partner Ryan.

 

Bringing Amateurism into the Choral Classroom to Inspire Lifelong Learners

October 11, 2022 – 7:00 pm to 8:00 pm Eastern

If you are a NAfME member and would like to view this program, contact johnd@nafme.org. 

America is full of former musicians. As a music teacher I constantly meet adults who tell of how they used to perform in school band, choir, or orchestra. I cannot help but imagine if the world would be a better place for them, and for everyone, if they had continued actively learning and making music. Too often our music classes place the strongest emphasis on musical performance products of large ensembles. That focus can leave graduates with little more in their hands than trophies and fond memories. Schools should provide them the inspiration and skills to continue active, vibrant musical lives after high school ends. Preparing students to become amateur adult musicians equips them with the abilities to make music independently and in small groups, for their own personal enjoyment, in a variety of styles (especially those they choose), with modern instruments.

In this webinar, I will address the philosophical position of amateurism in music education, then present lessons that increase students’ musical independence, curiosity, and transferable knowledge in many genres. Learning activities include performing, composing, improvising, listening, collaborating, songwriting, arranging, and producing. In my chorus class I utilize the ukulele and keyboards, which engage students and aid them in developing powerful musical knowledge that can sustain their musical involvement into adulthood.

Tom FitzStephens currently serves as a music teacher at Lakeside High School in Atlanta, Georgia and is a Music Education PhD candidate at Georgia State University. He also serves Capitol City Opera as the Madrigal Singers Director. Tom holds a Bachelor of Choral Music Education from The University of Michigan School of Music, Theatre & Dance, and a Master of Music in Conducting from Michigan State University’s College of Music. He studied conducting with Dr. Jerry Blackstone, Dr. Sandra Snow, Dr. Jonathan Reed, and Dr. David Rayl, and voice with George Irving Shirley and Molly Fillmore.

Tom has twelve years of full-time public high school music teaching experience and four years of private high school and middle school music teaching experience. He has played in rock bands all his life. He currently spends his summers as Vocal Music Director and Music Department Chair at the Georgia Governor’s Honors Program at Berry College, working with Georgia’s most gifted high school students.

 

Successful Music Instruction for English Language Learners

October 6, 2022 –  7:00 pm to 8:00 pm Eastern

Click here to access a robust resource with lessons plans from these authors.

If you are a NAfME member and would like to view this program, contact johnd@nafme.org. 

Students come to the music classroom with different linguistic and cultural backgrounds. For those classified as English learners (ELs), the ability of music teachers to scaffold instruction in order to make it meaningful and help the students develop English proficiency at the same time is essential. According to the federal government, there are currently 5 million EL students (10.1 percent of the total U.S. student population), and this statistic has increased every year with a predicted continued upward trajectory. Without supports in place, ELs often experience challenges in the classroom setting. These challenges are related to their comprehension of the academic content as well as their ability to engage meaningfully with their teacher and peers for social or academic purposes. Even in the music classroom, ELs may struggle with the linguistic demands put upon them, from unknown vocabulary in an Appalachian folk song to navigating a score in an orchestra rehearsal, or even something as basic as understanding and being able to follow directions for a class activity. 

Sheltered instruction can help connect students to the content, to language, and to one another. Sheltered instruction encourages teachers to build on students’ background knowledge (including language and literacy skills in the home language) using an asset-based approach that affirms and centers what students know and can do (Short et al., 2018). This session will provide music teachers with components for effective instruction of ELs using the Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol (SIOP). Participants will then apply the SIOP practices to lessons and repertoire they currently teach.

Participants will:

  • Develop strategies for how to instruct English language learners
  • Apply SIOP practices to repertoire and lesson plans
  • Experience a music lesson taught in Spanish without using SIOP practices and then teach it again using SIOP. This process will not only have participants learn the practices but also will have them experience what it can feel like to be an ELL in classrooms where they are supported and where they are not. 

Cara Bernard is Associate Professor of Music Education at the University of Connecticut, where she teaches courses in choral and elementary methods and curriculum. As a conductor, Cara prepared choruses for performances at Carnegie Hall and Lincoln Center. Cara’s research areas include music teacher evaluation, policy, curriculum, and social justice. She serves on the editorial committees of Music Educators Journal, Arts Education Policy Review, Journal of Music Teacher Education, Journal of Popular Music Education, and is associate editor of Visions of Research in Music Education. She is co-author of the book Navigating Teacher Evaluation: A Guide for Music Teachers, published by Oxford University Press. 


Joseph Michael Abramo, Ed. D. is an Associate Professor of Music Education in the Neag School of Education at the University of Connecticut, where he teaches undergraduate courses in instrumental methods and graduate courses in the theoretical foundations of music education and popular music and informal learning, and supervises student teachers. He has presented internationally and has published over 30 articles and book chapters. He is a co-author of the book Music Teacher Evaluation: A Guide for Teachers in the U.S. also published by Oxford University Press and is Senior Editor of the journal Visions of Research in Music Education. 

 

We Want to Hear from You – a NAfME Professional Learning Town Hall

September 29, 2022  – 7:00 pm to 8:00 pm Eastern

This discussion-based event was not recorded.

NAfME’s Professional Learning and Partnerships Committee (PLPC) wants to hear from you!

Join members of the PLPC for an interactive discussion (an “unwebinar”) focused on key trends and issues facing PreK-12 teachers nationwide. Share your success stories/innovations, challenges, questions, and areas where you would like to see more professional development resources as you start the new school year.

What are the most important current and emerging trends you are seeing in your area? Examples of issues identified by the PLPC in recent months include teacher self-care, student recruitment, support for new teachers, innovation in the classroom and curriculum to meet changing needs, culturally responsive teaching, addressing learning loss, classroom management, advocating for music education in your school, staff shortages, and ensuring success for new teachers.

The committee will take their lead from the input, interests, and priorities of the registrants/attendees. Breakout rooms will be used for parts of the townhall to allow discussions on specific topics in smaller groups. To encourage robust sharing, this event will not be recorded.

 

Jazz Programming at Every Level

September 21, 2022 – 7:00 to 8:00 pm Eastern

If you are a NAfME member and would like to view this program, contact johnd@nafme.org. 

During this NAfME Town Hall, Council for Jazz Education members Joseph Jefferson and Peter Sampson will discuss how choosing great literature to teach from is key to building a successful jazz program at any level.  Whether you have a blossoming jazz program or are starting from scratch, the music you decide to teach with makes a difference.

Moderator: Bethany Robinson, Chair, NAfME Council for Jazz Education.

Presenters:

Dr. Joseph L. Jefferson is the Associate Professor of Trombone/Euphonium and Director of Jazz Studies at Southeast Missouri State University.  He has been an invited guest artist and presenter at the International Trombone Festival, Jazz Education Network Conference, among many others. At the 13th Annual Jazz Education Network Conference, Dr. Jefferson was awarded the 2022 Ellis Marsalis, Jr. Jazz Educator of the Year.

Lisa Linde teaches instrumental music in Massachusetts at Newton South High School where her ensembles regularly receive top ratings at state and national festivals .  She is also a passionate advocate for gender equality in jazz and is the founder of the nonprofit, jazzhers. Ms Linde  is a frequent adjudicator, clinician and guest conductor and was the 2022  recipient of the MICCA Hall of Fame award for teaching excellence.

 

Between the Podium and Me: Recruiting and Mentoring a Diverse Body of Future Music Teachers

September 20, 2022 – 7:00 to 8:00 pm Eastern

If you are a NAfME member and would like to view this program, contact johnd@nafme.org. 

Can you imagine going through your entire K-12 career without ever encountering a teacher who looks like you? This is precisely the case for many of our young musicians of color, leading many to question whether or not they truly belong in music. Join us as we explore the beginnings of a career in music education for students of color through stories from music educators, music administrators, and music teacher trainers. Craft a plan to support and encourage your diverse student-musicians from elementary school through their first teaching job. Develop strategies for recruiting a more representative body of music teachers and enjoy the exponential impact you can have on future musicians for years to come! (This webinar is part of a Building a Legacy series.)

Panelists:

Angelica Brooks 2

Angelica Brooks serves as an adjunct professor at the University of Maryland Baltimore County in the Music Education department.  She is an award-winning choral director and music educator. She received her Bachelor of Music from Bowie State University, her Master of Music from The Catholic University of America and received her Administrator I Certification from McDaniel College. 

During her tenure as a public school educator, she was named a Maryland Music Educators Associations’ Outstanding Music Educator in 2021 and Prince George’s County Public Schools Teacher of the Year in 2019.  She has taught Vocal and General Music for grades PreK-12 for 13 years and served as a mentor teacher, curriculum writer, and professional development presenter for MMEA, MAC-OASA, and MSDE Fine Arts Office. Mrs. Brooks is now a 3rd year DMA student In the Music Teaching and Learning Department at the University of Southern California. Her research area of focus is on the recruitment and retention of minority music educators as an act of social justice in music education.

Annalisa C. Chang

Annalisa C. Chang is Associate Professor of Music and Director of Music Education at Clayton State University in Morrow, Georgia.  At Clayton State, Dr. Chang teaches general music education courses, string methods, music for early childhood, music appreciation, and supervises student teachers. Additionally, she serves as the Associate Conductor of the Clayton County Youth Orchestra and the Director of the CSU Music Preparatory School.

Her research on string teacher education, the inclusion of students with disabilities in string classrooms, and equitable access to music education has been presented at state, national, and international music education conferences. Her work has been published in the String Research Journal, the Florida Music Director, and the ArkMEA Journal. Dr. Chang is an active member of the American String Teachers Association (ASTA), currently serving on the Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Committee and the Research Committee. She is also an active member of the National Association for Music Education (NAfME) through her participation in the Georgia Music Educators Association as the state CNAfME Advisor, a member of the Musician Health and Wellness Area for Strategic Planning and Action (ASPA), and the Children with Exceptionalities Special Research Interest Group (SRIG), for which she is currently Chair-Elect.

Dr. Chang holds degrees in Music Education from Florida State University (Ph.D), and the University of North Carolina at Greensboro (M.M., B.M) where she was a North Carolina Teaching Fellow.

Monica Guido

Monica Guido is band director at Mannion Middle School in Henderson, NV where she conducts the Wind Ensemble, Symphonic Band, Concert Band and Beginning Band in a program of 300 students!  Mrs. Guido assists the Foothill High School Marching Band as a flute section coach and visual instructor. Mrs. Guido has been a music educator for 20 years in the states of Texas and Nevada, and as a flutist, has performed at the Texas Bandmasters Association, Texas Music Educators Association, and the Midwest Conference in Chicago. Mrs. Guido’s ensembles have earned superior ratings at the Clark County School District Band Festivals and Best Overall at music festivals in California, Washington, and New York.

Ebonee Woodland

Ebonee Woodland is the Assistant Band Director at North Side High School in Jackson, TN. She has earned her Bachelors Degree in Music Education at The University of Tennessee at Martin. During her time at Martin, she held leadership positions in CNAfME for her college and state level. Since college, she has been on staff for Project Imagination Winterguard for three years, served as President for the Jackson Alumnae Chapter of Sigma Alpha Iota, and she now serves as Psi C Province Officer for Sigma Alpha Iota. 

John Rine Zabanal is an educator, conductor, clinician, and researcher in string music education. He has presented research and pedagogy at national conferences for the American String Teacher Association, the National Association for Music Education, the International Research Symposium for Talent Education with the Suzuki Association of the Americas, as well as state music education conferences nationwide. He has articles published with Update: Applications for Music Research, String Research Journal, and the American String Teacher, and served on the editorial board for AST, Update, and Contributions to Music Education. He is also an active clinician, adjudicator, and guest conductor across the eastern United States.

His work has included being an assistant professor and director of string music education at VanderCook College of Music, where he taught courses in string techniques, string methods, and conducting, directed the Philharmonic Orchestra and string ensembles, and supervised student teachers. He was also an adjunct professor at Florida State University where he taught courses in music education and music technology. He was previously the orchestra teacher at Riverbend High School, Ni River Middle School, and Freedom Middle School in Spotsylvania County Public Schools, Virginia. He holds degrees in music education from The Ohio State University (BME) and Florida State University (MME, Ph.D.).

 

Creativity Across the Curriculum

To view this recording click here.

Creativity is usually an assumed part of being musical. In fact, creating is one of the three artistic processes that ground the 2014 National Music Standards. In this webinar we suggest ways that creative musicking has the potential to transform music learning across music subjects and grade levels when it is at the forefront of curricular planning. Focusing on the development of students’ creative musicianship provides them with increased musical agency and the ability to improvise, compose, expressively perform the music of others, and listen to music, independently and in groups, with greater efficacy and personal meaning. Strategies for K-12 classes and ensembles are included.

Presenters (click here to see the presenters’ bios): 

  • William I. Bauer, Professor, Area Head for Music Education, and Director of the Online MM in Music Education Program, University of Florida
  • Marshall Haning, Assistant Professor of Music Education, University of Florida
  • Barry Hartz, Assistant Professor of Music Education, University of Florida
  • Megan M. Sheridan, Assistant Professor of Music Education, University of Florida
  • Peter R. Webster, Scholar-in-Residence, Thornton School of Music at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles; Professor Emeritus of Music Education at the Bienen School of Music, Northwestern University 

 

Let’s Put the Festive Back In Student Festivals!

Thursday, June 16, 2022 – 7:00 to 8:00 pm EDT

If you are a NAfME member and would like to view this program, contact johnd@nafme.org. 

As we wrap up what many would consider one of the toughest teaching years on record, it is a great time for secondary instrumental; and choral educators to dream big about ways to utilize the understandings and knowledge we’ve gathered over this trying period about our students, and what really matters.  It has been a time of reckoning for many of us as we realize that many of our students (and we) have different needs after all that has happened, yet we are still often obliged to engage in many of the same types of adjudicated events that likely needed an overhaul pre-covid, with unadjusted requirements, and unchanged rubrics.  This has to be causing some cognitive dissonance for us as we saunter into the summer.  Join Beth Fortune and Kelly Clingan (co-hosts of the popular Music Education podcast The Beth and Kelly Show) and string specialists Dr. Kelsey Nussbaum (University of Washington), and Corie Benton (Cobb County School District) in an interactive discussion and idea-gathering NAfME Council for Orchestral Education Town Hall all about putting the FESTIVE back into student festivals!

Corie Benton is the Orchestra Director at Pope High School in Cobb County, Georgia. Throughout her tenure as a music educator, she has been very active in the music community. Her activities have included presenting a workshop at Georgia Music Educators Association In-Service (2013), performing at GMEA In-Service twice, and having her orchestras perform as well in 2015 and 2019. Also, her orchestras competed in the National Orchestra Festival (2018) and received superior ratings.  She is a regularly requested Adjudicator at workshops, clinics, honor orchestras, and LGPE’s in the metro Atlanta area.  She is a member of NAfME, GMEA, and the Past President of the Georgia chapter of ASTA. As of February 2021, Benton became a National Board Member of ASTA. When not teaching, she designs jewelry for her jewelry company, Me and My Sweetpea. Although she loves music, her greatest love is her family.  She is married to Robert Benton and has two sons, Cameron and William.

Kelly Clingan is the Education Director at Seattle JazzED, a non-profit organization dedicated to racial and gender equity in jazz education. She is the former Director of Concert Bands and Jazz at Washington Middle School, where she taught from 2008 to 2016, and co-host of the popular music education podcast “The Beth and Kelly Show.”  Kelly was named the 2016 University of Washington GWSS Alumni of the Year for her work on gender equity in jazz.

Dr. Kelsey Nussbaum currently teaches undergraduate and graduate coursework in music education at the University of Washington. Nussbaum pursues an active research agenda that explores institutional, structural, and societal barriers which may be impacting access, equity, and inclusion within all levels of music education with a particular interest on competition. She currently serves as Vice-Chair of the ASTA Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion committee and on the board of the National String Project Consortium.

Beth Fortune
Photo by Eric Frommer

Elizabeth Fortune is the Director of Orchestras at Seattle’s Ballard High School. From 2002-2018, she was the Director of Orchestras and Eclectic Strings at Seattle’s Washington Middle School. In addition to teaching in Seattle Public Schools, she is director of the award nominated educational programming at the Wintergrass Music Festival. Elizabeth is the co-host of a popular music education podcast/ Facebook Live show called “The Beth and Kelly Show.” She is also a curriculum writer for the Library of Congress Teaching with Primary Sources Project, a collaboration between the Library and the NAfME.  In 2020, Fortune was appointed as chair of the NAfME’s Council for Orchestral Education.  In 2019-2021, Fortune was a member of the American String Teachers Association Board of Directors.  In 2018, she was a recipient of the Country Music Association’s Music Teachers of Excellence distinction. In 2015, Fortune was one of 25 semi-finalists out of 7,000 nominations for the Grammy Music Educator Award. She is also an active contributor to the Washington Music Educators’ Association, JEN, and the International Bluegrass Music Association.

 

College Readiness and the Piano: What Every Prospective Music Major Needs to Know

June 15, 2022 – 7:00 to 8:00 pm EDT

If you are a NAfME member and would like to view this program, contact johnd@nafme.org. 

  • I don’t know anything about piano, will I have to take it in college?
  • I can mess around a little on piano, will that be okay for college? 
  • I’ve been taking lessons since I was 5, do I still have to take beginner piano in college?
  • Why do I have to study piano in college if I’m going to be in instrumental music ed?

As a collegiate faculty member in piano whose courseload includes coordinating the entire Class Piano program, I face questions like these every year from high school prospective applicants (and their parents) who are interested in auditioning for college as a music major.  I also face questions like these from high school ensemble directors and private instructors who are trying to ensure their students get into college and possibly have a shot at scholarships and/or advanced placement.  This webinar seeks to address all these questions and provide a valuable tool for making sure prospective music majors are fully prepared for collegiate music study.  I will be providing an overview of the basic applied skills prospective music majors will learn on the piano, regardless of their intended field of study, and regardless of their main instrument.  

Even if you have no formal study or lesson experience on the piano, there is still plenty of valuable information and preparation a prospective major can do in order to be ready for piano study at the collegiate level!  This webinar aims to be valuable resource for all questions regarding college readiness and the piano.

This webinar is meant for any music students considering studying music at the college level, regardless of major (Performance, Music Ed, Composition, BA, Jazz Studies, etc.) or main instrument.  I am also looking to reach all high-school music instructors (and parents/guardians) who have students planning on studying music in college.

Dr. Leonidas Lagrimas serves as Assistant Professor of Piano and Piano Pedagogy at Western Carolina University. His duties include coordinating the Class Piano program and teaching Applied Piano.  

An emerging leader in piano pedagogy research, Dr. Lagrimas has served as a presenter/clinician at numerous local, state, regional, and national music conferences, including MTNA, GP3, NAfME, NCKP, and College Music Society. He is a frequently invited guest lecturer throughout the country with recent past workshops and appearances at the Eastman School of Music, University of Cincinnati-Conservatory of Music (CCM), Bethune-Cookman University (FL), SUNY Buffalo State College, Reinhardt University (GA), and Milligan College (TN).  

Dr. Lagrimas holds National Certification in piano from MTNA, and a Ph.D. in Music Education and Piano Pedagogy from Florida State University.  Prior to his doctoral studies, he served as a music teacher in the New York City public schools for ten years.

A NAfME Council for Band Education Town Hall: The Realities of Music Education Today

*May 31, 2022, 7:00 to 8:00 pm Eastern

*Update: The Council for Band Education Town Hall that was scheduled for May 31 was postponed.  Future programming focused on band education will be developed and announced via this web page and other NAfME communication channels. 

 

Making Key Changes: End-of-Year Questions for Reflection and Strategies to Refresh

May 23, 2022 – 7:00 to 8:00 pm EDT

If you are a NAfME member and would like to view this program, contact johnd@nafme.org. 

As the end of the school year quickly approaches, in addition to completing end-of-year tasks, consider carving out some quality time to reflect on the achievements and challenges of this year for both you and your students. What key changes do you want to make personally and professionally to refresh your classroom, curriculum, and career? What will you do this summer to prepare for these changes or transitions? How will you go about it? What questions will you ask? Whom will you include in the conversation and reconstruction? How are you feeling and what are you doing to prepare yourself, your students, your family, and your school community? You will enjoy the summer much more when you’ve given yourself enough time to reflect on the current school year and reasons to be excited about the future.   

Lori Schwartz Reichl 2021

Dr. Lori Schwartz Reichl has served as a proud educator since 2001. She has successfully led secondary music programs in a rural school in Pennsylvania and two Title I schools in Maryland, one of which was assigned to corrective action. In both states, Lori has had the opportunity to open two new school buildings and develop their curricula. In 2004, Lori received the Superintendent’s Award for Excellence in Teaching from the Daniel Boone Area School District (Pennsylvania). In 2011, she was a finalist for the Howard County Public School System’s (Maryland) Teacher of the Year Award and a finalist for the 2013 Howard County Parents for School Music Educator of the Year Award. Lori is the author of more than 75 articles for an assortment of educational publications and she designed these mentoring pieces into a graduate course that she instructs at The University of the Arts (Philadelphia) and VanderCook College of Music (Chicago) entitled “Making Key Changes: Refresh Your Music Program.” These unique experiences have permitted Lori to expand her multifaceted career into a portfolio as a clinician, conductor, instructor, speaker, and writer. She is often invited to provide meaningful and reflective professional development sessions to staff and students throughout the nation.

Dr. Lori Schwartz Reichl earned her Bachelor of Science in Music Education from West Chester University, Master of Music Education from Lebanon Valley College, Administrator I Certification through McDaniel College, and Doctor of Music Education from Liberty University. She lives in the Baltimore, Maryland area with her engineer-husband and their two children. Reichl has a newsletter, Making Key Changes, and leads a reflective summer graduate course.

 

Teaching Music Culturally

May 18, 20227:00 pm – 8:15 pm EDT

If you are a NAfME member and would like to view this program, contact johnd@nafme.org. 

We will address the present convergence of music, education and culture in K-12 and undergraduate curriculum and instruction. From our various perspectives, and with particular musical selections in mind, we will feature teaching-learning strategies for giving accent to intercultural understanding through the experience and study of global and American cultures. Attending to the oral-aural process of “learning by listening”, we will suggest that learners launch this understanding from initial listening to participatory musicking and full-fledged performance, which can then lead to creative experiences in the style of targeted works. The meaning of “teaching music culturally” will be clarified through illustrations in the integration of “back-stories” of music and musicians that reach beyond the sonic features to the music’s cultural meaning, uses and functions. We will make the point of teaching music and teaching culture, in tandem, and will suggest resources and pathways for supporting students to grow more widely and deeply musical as well as more cultural compassionate.

Presenters: Loneka Battiste, University of Tennessee; Will Coppola, University of Southern California; John-Carlos Perea, UC-Berkeley; Patricia Shehan Campbell, University of Washington; and Juliana Cantarelli Vita, University of Hartford.

Loneka Battiste is Assistant Professor of Music Education at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Drawing on 12 years of experience teaching children in school and community settings, she now teaches elementary general and middle school choral methods and graduate courses in music education. In 2019, she completed a Fulbright Fellowship at Universidade Federal de Pernambuco(UFPE) in Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil where she studied coco, a musical tradition of the Brazilian northeast, gave lectures on African American musics and culturally responsive teaching, and formed a gospel choir. Her scholarly interests include equity and inclusion and culturally responsive teaching in music education. 

Pat Campbell

Patricia Shehan Campbell is Donald E. Peterson Professor of Music at the University of Washington, where she teaches courses at the interface of education and ethnomusicology, with specializations in  the pedagogy of world music cultures and children’s musical culture music and music learning processes. She is the author of Lessons from the World, Music in Cultural Context, Songs in Their Heads, Teaching Music GloballyMusic, Education, and Diversity: Bridging Cultures and Communities, co-author of Music in Childhood, and co-editor of Oxford’s 28-volume Global Music Series, Oxford’s Global Music Cultures, and The Oxford Handbook on Children’s Musical Cultures. Recipient of the Taiji Award (China) and the Koizumi Prize (Japan) for work on the preservation of traditional music through educational practice, she is educational consultant to Smithsonian Folkways Recordings and the Association for Cultural Equity (the Global Jukebox), and editor of the seven-volume series on World Music Pedagogy (2018-2021) for practicing and prospective teachers.

Juliana Cantarelli Vita

Juliana Cantarelli Vita is an Assistant Professor of Elementary and Early Childhood Music Education at University of Hartford’s Hartt School. She earned her Ph.D. in Music Education with an emphasis in Ethnomusicology from the University of Washington, and current co-chair of the Education Section of the Society for Ethnomusicology.

Blending her interests in music education and ethnomusicology, Juliana has presented papers and given clinics on the topic of multicultural sensitivity, Afro-Brazilian drumming traditions, children’s musical cultures, and gender and music. Juliana has been a guest speaker at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Augustana College, Georgia State University, Florida International University, Gonzaga University, Seattle Pacific University, and Federal University of Pernambuco. Blending her interests in music education and ethnomusicology, she has presented papers and given clinics at several national and international conferences in North America, South America, and Europe. As a researcher, she has published papers in The Orff Echo (Winter 2017 and Fall 2020), Perspectives: Journal of the Early Childhood Music & Movement Association (2018), and the Journal of Folklore and Education (2020), with a chapter on the upcoming Oxford Handbook of Early Learning and Development, and the Oxford Handbook of Feminism and Music Education. In 2020, she joined The Orff Echo editorial board.

William J. Coppola is Assistant Professor of Music Teaching and Learning at the University of Southern California Thornton School of Music. He was previously assistant professor of music education at the University of North Texas. Will is co-author of World Music Pedagogy, Vol. IV: Instrumental Music Education (Routledge, 2018) and World Music Pedagogy, Vol. VII: World Music in Higher Education (Routledge, 2020). He is a certified Smithsonian Folkways World Music Pedagogy and Kodály educator, and holds degrees from the University of Washington, New York University, and Hofstra University. Will was previously an elementary music director with New York City Public Schools.

John-Carlos Perea

John-Carlos Perea is an ethnomusicologist, electric bassist, singer, and cedar flautist (as well as a Grammy award winner). His research interests include American Indian powwow, urban American Indian lived experiences and cultural productions, recording and archiving practices, Native and African American jazz cultures, and the Creek and Kaw saxophonist Jim Pepper. He is currently Visiting Professor at UC-Berkeley, and has since 2010 served as Associate Professor of American Indian Studies in the College of Ethnic Studies at San Francisco State University.

 

Recruiting and Rebuilding: A Council for Choral Education Town Hall

May 17, 2022 – 7:00 pm to 8:00 pm EDT

If you are a NAfME member and would like to view this program, contact johnd@nafme.org. 

The NAfME Council for Choral Education knows that recruiting and rebuilding is one of the greatest challenges you face as we continue to provide quality programs. Attend our town hall to hear a few ideas, present some of your own, and to allow the Council for Choral Education to understand your ongoing concerns.  

Dean Luethi

Dr. Dean Luethi serves as the Director of Choral Activities and Associate Professor at Washington State University. He received degrees from the University of Wisconsin – Green Bay, University of South Florida in Tampa, University of Illinois – Urbana/Champaign. Known for his work as a choral pedagogue, Dean has presented research, workshops, or conducted choirs at festivals, conferences, and competitions in the US, India, China, Cuba, Canada, Austria, Poland, and Germany. He is published by GIA and has written articles for Choral Journal, Music Educators Journal, and Teaching Music. Dean lives in Pullman, WA with his wife and their two cats. 

 

General Music Town Hall: How Are You Doing?

May 16, 2022 – 7:00 pm to 8:00 pm EDT

Please note that to provide participants with an opportunity to have the best possible open discussion this event was not recorded.

Join members of the NAfME Council for General Music Education as we debrief this school year, talk about “hot button issues” in education, discuss wrapping up the 2021-2022 school year, and taking time for rest this summer. 

 

Pay Attention!

May 11, 2022 – 7:00 pm to 8:00 pm EDT

If you are a NAfME member and would like to view this program, contact johnd@nafme.org. 

Teaching in a world where students are experiencing trauma, anxiety, depression, and a myriad of other confusing emotions has had an impact on classrooms all over the world. Many of the classroom management and motivation strategies you learned in college or that have worked in the past just aren’t working with kids today.

They come into our classrooms and we tell them to pay attention, but do we ever teach them how to pay attention? With all the changes, distractions, pressure and everything else vying for students’ attention, how do you create a space where students feel peaceful and supported so they can authentically express themselves as artists amidst everything else that’s going on in their lives?

The music classroom provides a space and a medium for helping students identify, process, and appropriately express what they are experiencing, but after all the changes and challenges of the past several years, getting them to actively and appropriately participate with one another is something that we must intentionally teach.

In this session, you will:

  • Learn how to get your students “tuned up” for music class so they are able to get in a more focused and ready-to-learn state
  • Understand how the intentional introduction and practicing of the skill of focusing impacts instruction, learning, behavior, interactions, classroom management and more
  • Feel the physical and mental impact of what this four-minute protocol has on you so you can imagine how it can impact your students when practiced on a regular basis
  • Know how to effectively implement this in your classroom so you can spend more time teaching and less time managing behaviors, repeating instructions, following up with directions, and all of those other pesky things that get in the way of the joy of making music

Lesley Moffat is a high school band director who helps band directors build successful music programs without burning out. Having experienced the joys of teaching along with health issues that come as the result of stress, exhaustion, and 14-hour work days, she wrote her first book, I Love My Job but It’s Killing Me as a guide for teachers to take control of their own health. Her second book, Love the Job, Lose the Stress takes the principles from her first book and applies them to the classroom. The techniques she teaches to her students, clients, and music teachers all over the world have been used before and during the pandemic to help educators and students minimize the impact of stress on their emotional, mental, and physical health. She teaches in a suburb of Seattle, Washington. Fun fact: Lesley, her dad, husband, and all three of her daughters have performed at Carnegie Hall.

 

An Influencer’s Toolkit: Practical Steps to Build Your Legacy

May 4, 2022 – 7:00 pm to 8:00 pm EDT

If you are a NAfME member and would like to view this program, contact johnd@nafme.org. 

Do you remember the moment you fell in love with making music? What about the moment you discovered your passion for teaching music? This influencer’s toolkit will provide practical steps to share powerful teaching experiences with potential future music teachers. Featuring music major nights, teaching awards, and “future music educator events,” you will leave this session ready to contribute to the future in a whole new way. Join us for this highly interactive webinar and build your legacy today!  This session will include input from Larisa Marian, Director of Orchestras, Tuscarora High School, in Loudoun County, Virginia and Krista Mergen a senior music education major at the University of Tennessee at Martin. 

Angela Ammerman

Angela Ammerman, referred to by the Washington Post as a “music teacher prodigy,” recently completed her first book: The Music Teacher’s Guide to Engaging English Language Learners published by GIA Music and written by a team of ELL experts. Now, hard at work on her next book: The Music Teacher’s Guide to Classroom Management, Ammerman hopes to provide greatly needed resources for music educators. Dr. Ammerman grew up listening to her mother teach piano lessons in her own home and attributes much of her own passion for teaching to her musical mother and her work ethic to her dad.

Currently living in Virginia with her incredibly supportive husband and toddler, Ammerman works at George Mason University where she supervises student teachers and teaches String Methods, Lab Orchestra, and Aural Skills. Ammerman has been named the Virginia Orchestra Director of the Year and was recognized by the Virginia House of Delegates for her dedication to music education. Ammerman is in high demand as a clinician and guest conductor and has recently been invited to conduct the California Jr. High All State Orchestra as well as the Georgia Middle School All State Orchestra. Dr. Ammerman is in awe of the resilience and dedication of music educators, students, and parents across the United States and is honored to have the opportunity to share with them. 

 

NAfME Council for Jazz Education Town Hall: Energize and Expand Participation in Your Jazz Program

April 18, 2022 – 7:00 pm to 8:00 pm EDT

If you are a NAfME member and would like to view this program, contact johnd@nafme.org. 

Join members of NAfME’s Council for Jazz Education Executive Committee for a special town hall celebrating Jazz Appreciation Month! Two experienced educators and council members will share their insights and practical ideas and strategies for getting more girls involved on the bandstand through systematic changes in beginning band practices and holding Jazz Girls Day events to build leaders. This interactive event will be of interest to experienced members of our jazz education community, as well as those new to teaching jazz. Share your successes, ideas, and challenges with your peers!

Presenters:

Photo by Chi Brown

Dr. Lenora Helm Hammonds (p/k/a Lenora Zenzalai Helm) is a jazz vocal musician, composer, lyricist, and big band bandleader with seven commercial recordings, two-time Fulbright senior music specialist and former U.S. Jazz Ambassador. She is tenured, Associate Professor in the Department of Music and Jazz Studies Program at North Carolina Central University (NCCU), responsible for numerous student initiatives including NCCUs Teaching Artist Certificate Program. Since 2005, she has grown the vocal jazz component teaching undergraduate and graduate courses for NCCU Jazz Studies, as Director of the award-winning NCCU Vocal Jazz Ensemble.

Her arts practice coalesces the intersections of jazz, digital humanities, and intercultural maturity research, embodied in international presentations as a clinician, published research, and current collaborative projects for the Mellon Foundation and National Endowment of the Arts. Lenora’s 6th CD, I Love Myself When I’m Laughing, was listed on Independent Ear’s “30 recommended Record Releases.” Her seventh CD was a crowd-funded release, For the Love of Big Band (FTLOBB) with her big band, Tribe Jazz Orchestra®, released March 2020. FTLOBB joined her 4 previous CDs with first round GRAMMY® listings and landed in the Top 50 releases of the year in JazzWeek. Lenora holds a Doctor of Musical Arts in Music Education from Boston University a Master of Music in Jazz Performance from East Carolina University and a Bachelor of Music in Film Scoring and Vocal Performance from Berklee College of Music. Former President of the NYC based nonprofit, International Women in Jazz, she serves on several boards and committees for music advocacy and music education organizations including being on the Jazz Vocal Advisory board for Juilliard Jazz, and a current term as Southeastern Representative for NAfME’s Jazz Council. A MacDowell composer fellow, her current and upcoming composer projects include a film score (The Problem of the Hero) about the Richard Wright book Native Son, and an eighth recording of original compositions from her Chamber Music America/Doris Duke Charitable Foundation New Works Jazz commission titled Journeywoman. www.LenoraHelm.com

Bethany Robinson is a Yamaha Performing Artist, 2022 Grammy Music Educator Award Finalist, Chair-Elect for the NAfME Jazz Council and President of the Indiana Jazz Educators Association. She is the Jazz Band Director for Noblesville Schools in Noblesville, Indiana. Robinson was named 2014 Indiana Jazz Educator of the Year, 2015 Noblesville Teacher of the Year and was a 2016 Indiana Teacher of the Year Semi-Finalist. She helps lead the annual Indiana Jazz Girls Day, was a keynote speaker for the 2021 Australia National Band and Orchestra Conference and presenter for the 2021 Indiana Music Educator Association Conference. She spends her time outside the classroom playing upright and electric bass in the Indianapolis area.

 

NAfME Council for Guitar Education Town Hall – “Come One, Come All”!

April 8, 2022 – 8:00 pm to 9:15 pm EDT

If you are a NAfME member and would like to view this program, contact johnd@nafme.org. 

Calling all NAfME Guitar Educators! The NAfME Council for Guitar Education is hosting an online Town Hall. This is a great opportunity to connect with our Guitar Community and hear from fellow guitar teachers around the U.S. The Guitar Council want to know and have you share what you are doing in the classroom.

Discussion facilitators: Christopher Perez, Chair, Council for Guitar Education, and Director of Guitar Studies at Freedom High School in Orlando, and other Council for Guitar Education Executive Committee Members.

 

Building a Legacy: Mentoring Future Music Educators from Kindergarten to 12th Grade!

March 29, 2022 – 7:00 pm to 8:00 pm EDT

If you are a NAfME member and would like to view this program, contact johnd@nafme.org. 

A music teacher mentor can shape a future music educator’s future in significant and powerful ways. Learn how to find future music teachers in classrooms at any level and build the tools to mentor these students. Participate in small breakout rooms with other music teachers hoping to contribute to the future of music education as you create your own recruiting and mentoring plan for your students. Craft early teaching experiences for even your elementary students and learn how to transform concerned parents into their child’s biggest advocates! Join us for this highly interactive webinar and prepare your students for an incredible future in the most rewarding of jobs. This is part three of NAfME’s “Building a Legacy” webinar series.

Jonathan Helmick is Director of Bands and Associate Professor of Music at Slippery Rock University. Under his direction, the Slippery Rock University Wind Ensemble was named a finalist for the prestigious American Prize in Wind Ensemble and Concert Band Performance. In 2019, the two-hundred-member “Marching Pride” performed in Ireland at the Dublin St. Patrick’s Festival Parade and the Limerick International Band Championship, receiving the honor of being named Best Overall Band, Best Adult Band, and Best International Band. He is honored to be the 2017-2018 President’s Award for Excellence in Teaching recipient at S.R.U. Helmick has served as a guest clinician in Florida, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Mississippi, New Mexico, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, Austria, the Czech Republic, Italy, and Sicily. A 2019 Pennsylvania Music Educators Association Citation of Excellence recipient, he was named one of Yamaha’s “40 Under 40” educators in 2022.

Helmick holds the Doctor of Musical Arts Degree in Conducting from The University of Southern Mississippi. He earned a Master of Music degree in Euphonium Performance with a cognate area in Music Theory from The University of Akron in Akron, Ohio. Both his Bachelor of Music in Music Education degree and Bachelor of Arts in Business and Organizational Communications degrees were received from the University of Akron with honors.

Amanda Schlegel

Amanda Schlegel originally hails from Pennsylvania. She is assistant professor of instrumental Music Education at The University of South Carolina. Prior to UofSC, Amanda was Associate Professor and Chair of Music Education at The University of Southern Mississippi in Hattiesburg. Amanda taught middle and high school band and orchestra in the public schools of western Pennsylvania. In addition to band and orchestra, Amanda also taught secondary vocal music, elementary general music, drama, theory, and directed several musical theater productions.  

Amanda holds a Bachelor of Music degree from Grove City College, a Master of Music in Music Education from Northwestern University, and a Ph.D. from Louisiana State University. At UofSC, Amanda teaches middle school and high school band methods, psychology of music, supervises student teachers, advises masters theses and doctoral dissertations, and directs the Congaree New Horizons Band Program.

Her research interests surround music perception and cognition as a function of instrumental music teacher/conductor effectiveness, music teacher education, affective and emotional responses to music, and increasing music making participation among more people and musics. Her scholarly work has been published in the Journal of Research in Music Education, Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, Psychology of Music, and International Journal of Music Education. She has served as chair of the NAfME Perception and Cognition and Affective Response Special Research Interest Groups and is a Modern Band teaching fellow.

Kathleen Melago is Professor of Music Education at Slippery Rock University and has served as Division Head of Music Education since she joined the faculty in August 2009.  Kathy received her Bachelor of Science in Music Education from Slippery Rock University, her Master of Music in flute performance from the University of Northern Iowa, her Master of Arts in Music Education from Eastern Illinois University, and her Doctor of Musical Arts from The Ohio State University.  She has taught music in Pennsylvania, Iowa, and Ohio, both in schools and privately, and frequently presents at conferences.  Recently, Kathy authored an interactive e-text for music appreciation courses called Exploring Music with Top Hat.  Her achievements in online teaching have been recognized with the 2020 Online Learning Consortium Effective Practices Award and as the award winner for the high school/higher education category of the 2021 Lowell Mason House Virtual Lesson Plan Competition.

 

Educating the Future Music Professional Through Service-Learning

March 9, 2022 – 7:00 pm to 8:00 pm EST

If you are a NAfME member and would like to view this program, contact johnd@nafme.org. 

If you are a beginning band director or a college professor teaching a beginning woodwind techniques/pedagogy class, this session is for you! We will discuss what we have learned over the last 10 years of our service-learning collaboration. This session will explain: who can be a Service-Learning partner, how to incorporate Service-Learning into your classroom, and what are the service and learning objectives. We will also share ideas for a recruitment/instrument display. Presenters: Mickey Smith Jr. and Jan Scott.

Mickey Smith Jr.‘ s heart is teaching but his passion is helping you discover yours. His KEEP ON GOING approach is encouraging educators and inspiring individuals across the world. Mickey is currently the Director of Music at The Greene School in West Palm Beach, Florida. Mickey was the winner of the GRAMMY Music Educator Award in 2020 and now travels across North America sharing his message and music of resilience and significance to entertain, educate, encourage, and elevate everyone to excellence. 

Jan Fillmore Scott recently retired in 2020 as Assistant Department Chair in the W.A. and Dorothy Hanna Department of Performing Arts at McNeese State University where she headed up the Woodwind Studio for clarinet, saxophone, and double reeds. During her tenure she taught applied woodwinds, woodwind techniques/pedagogy and developed a one-of-a-kind Service-Learning program. She received the Pinnacle Award, for her innovative work “Integrating Service-Learning into the Beginning Woodwind Class”.   Jan’s new book, Beginning Woodwind Class: A Manual for College and Middle School Classrooms, now available on Amazon, is a culmination of her development of the service-learning model.

 

Mindfulness Matters: How Music Educators Can Incorporate Mindfulness and Self-Care Practices into Busy Schedules

March 1, 2022 – 7:00 pm to 8:00 pm EST

If you are a NAfME member and would like to view this program, contact johnd@nafme.org. 

The goal of this webinar is to share why teacher self-care is vital to a successful career in music education. The presenters will share personal stories and case studies. They will also use live polling to discuss how teachers currently perceive the importance of teacher self-care and how they incorporate it into their daily routines. The presenters will discuss various strategies that teachers can integrate into their daily routines to reduce stress, increase mindfulness, and help to create a healthy work-home balance.

From this webinar teachers will:

  • Be presented with research and statistics associated with teacher attrition rates and the importance of self-care
  • Identify the long- and short-term benefits of incorporating daily mindfulness techniques and self-care practices
  • Identify the long- and short-term consequences of neglecting self-care and self-regard as a concept of serving the music teaching profession
  • Identify ways in which they incorporate mindfulness techniques and self-care into their daily routines
  • Receive a set of strategies to incorporate self-care into their daily routines
  • Receive a self-care downloadable PDF checklist, reflection sheet, and infographics related to the topic.

Johanna Royo received her BM and MM in Vocal Performance from New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM and PhD in Music Education with a minor in Musicology from the University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ. In addition to voice and choral instruction to pre-service teachers, she teaches vocal instruction methods classes to non-music majors, intending to utilize musical expression and skill to expand student self-concepts and encourage unique music-making experiences. Her research interests include self-efficacy, mind-body approaches, and peer influence in music education.

April Sholty received her B.M. in Music Education from Oklahoma Christian University, an M.M. in Music History and Literature from Texas State University, and a Ph.D. in Music Education with a minor in Theatre Arts from the University of Arizona. She currently serves as an Associate Professor of Music and Music Education Area Coordinator at Campbellsville University in Campbellsville, KY where she teaches both undergraduate and graduate level music education courses. Her research interests include arts integration in the elementary music classroom, and pre-service teacher mentorship and preparedness.

 

Building a Legacy: Recruiting Future Music Educators

February 22, 2022 – 7:00 pm to 8:00 pm EST

If you are a NAfME member and would like to view this program, contact johnd@nafme.org. 

The need for music educators across the country is great and you can help! This is the second program in a series. Learn how to leave a legacy with future music educators as you actively recruit music teachers from within your own program. Develop a music teacher mentoring mindset and brainstorm ways to engage your own students in early teaching experiences. Learn more about desirable teacher traits and begin to uncover those in your young musicians. Unlock powerful methods for reaching and convincing parents about the job availability, stability, and personal enjoyment of teaching music. Join us for this highly engaging webinar and begin to build your legacy! Host/presenter: Sandy Goldie.

Sandy Goldie is a Professor of Music Education at Virginia Commonwealth University where she teaches music education and string pedagogy courses. Before coming to VCU, Dr. Goldie taught graduate and undergraduate music education courses at the University of Florida, where she received the David Wilmot Prize for Excellence in Music Education. She is passionate about music teacher education and music education for people of all ages believing that music education offers something unique to individuals and society by heightening and strengthening a person’s sensitivity and awareness of beauty, offering transformative and empowering experiences, and improving the quality of life of the individual and the society in which they live long after formal instruction has ended. As a music teacher educator and researcher, she strives to offer preservice teachers experiences that can be intellectually and psychologically empowering and transformative in order to ready them to enter the world of music teaching with the passion and skills necessary to remain for a lifetime.

As a public school orchestra teacher for fourteen years as well as a guest conductor for many honors groups, all-regions, district clinics, youth orchestras, and the 2009 SC All-State Orchestra, Dr. Goldie has enjoyed working with students of all ages. Her orchestras have consistently received superior ratings each year at State Performance Festivals and in festivals throughout the United States and abroad.

Dr. Goldie is an active guest speaker and clinician and has presented her research and ideas at state, national and international conferences (NAfME, ASTA, SCMEA, ISAME). She has worked to promote music education at the local, state and national levels through leadership positions in professional organizations such as ASTA (former state president SC Chapter), NAfME (former executive board member, SCMEA orchestra division), AVS (president-elect, SC Chapter) and Arts Advisory councils at the local and school levels.

Dr. Goldie completed her PhD in Music Education at the University of Florida, her Master’s Degree in Music Education at the University of Georgia and her Bachelor’s degree in Music and Music Education at the University of South Carolina. When not teaching, Dr. Goldie enjoys performing and has performed professionally with symphonies in SC, NC, and GA, including the SC Philharmonic, Charleston Symphony, Symphony Orchestra Augusta, and others.   Her greatest loves are her family, her dog (Murray), her cat (Charlie) and the joy of sharing the excitement of teaching and playing orchestral music with her students.

 

Emotional Intelligence: Tools to Take Care of Yourself as a Music Teacher

February 16, 2022 – 7:00 pm EST

If you are a NAfME member and would like to view this program, contact johnd@nafme.org. 

Improving your emotional intelligence (EI) will enable you to become a more resonant teacher, driving a positive culture at school. We will explore the four pillars of EI so you can elevate your self-awareness, understand strategies for self-management, increase your social-awareness and gain tactics to manage relationships with ease. This workshop will challenge you to think about your role as a music teacher in a whole new way.

Educator and author, Jen Rafferty began her career as a music teacher in Central New York. She is known for her practical ideas and passion in her presentations while inspiring teachers to stay connected to their “why.” Jen is a certified Emotional Intelligence Practitioner and is pursuing her Ph.D. in Educational Psychology. Her love for teaching and insatiable curiosity has led her to develop the Empowered Educator program to elevate how teachers can show up for themselves and their students so they can thrive as they maintain longevity throughout their careers. Her most recent publication is the Amazon bestseller, A Place in the Staff: Finding Your Way as a Music Teacher

 

We Want to Hear from You – a NAfME Unwebinar

Thursday, February 10, 2022  – 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm EST

This discussion-oriented event was not recorded.  If you have ideas/feedback for the PDC for topics/issues for future events see the webinar submission link at the top of this page, or contact johnd@nafme.org.

NAfME’s Professional Development Committee (PDC) wants to hear from you! During these unprecedented, challenging times, music educators are increasingly pulled in many directions.

Common challenges include (but are not limited to):

  • Addressing learning loss and classroom management
  • Student recruitment
  • Staff shortages, ensuring success for new teachers, and teacher burn out
  • Adapting lesson plans to best meet short-term and long-term needs in the classroom.
  • Advocating for music education in your school.

This interactive Unwebinar, facilitated by members of the PDC, will provide opportunities for NAfME members to discuss key issues, share strategies, and strengthen community bonds with music educators facing similar challenges nationwide. You are not alone!

Prior to the event, those who register for this Unwebinar will be sent a short survey, an opportunity to share issues and concerns, Key questions include:

  • What are the in-class school-based challenges that you’re facing? 
  • What are the out-of-class school-based challenges that you’re facing?
  • What are the challenges away from school that have an impact on your teaching?
  • How can NAfME and your state association help you address these issues?
  • In a perfect world, what educational resources would you like to see made available to you that you currently don’t have access to?

Most of the discussion will be geared to PreK-12 issues. Please note that due to the interactive nature of this program, including using break out rooms for some of the discussions, this Unwebinar will not be recorded. A summary of key takeaways will be provided.

 

The Empathy Project: Accentuating the Inherent SEL Component of Music Education

February 2, 2022 – 7:00 pm EST

If you are a NAfME member and would like to view this program, contact johnd@nafme.org. 

The abrupt shift to remote learning in the spring of 2020 was a game changer for me as a music educator. The challenges of that period forced me out of my routines and toward a reinvention of my approach to teaching instrumental music. It pushed me beyond the scope of concert prep and existing curriculum to look at deeper questions that connected my students to music on a more profound level. 

What does music education mean to me? How can my students’ passion for music help others or themselves? Do they understand the power of music to heal, inspire, and strengthen community? How can it be an instrument of change in our society? 

The social-emotional needs of my students and our community emerged as paramount during these challenging times. It was an obligatory opportunity to connect our art form with the newly defined needs of our community and society in general, birthing high impact outcomes for everyone in the process. I will share the SEL infused activities my students and I created, the remarkable response, and potential answers to some of those big questions. 

Attendees will receive detailed descriptions of several SEL-infused activities they can immediately implement within their programs. We will discuss several heady pedagogical questions to encourage a reinvention of their approach to teaching that prioritizes social-emotional and life-long learning. They will be shown the benefits of incorporating SEL into their performing ensembles through actual responses from my own students.

David Schumacher is Director of Jazz & Bands for Pentucket High School. His students have earned top awards at the Berklee, UNH, and MAJE Jazz Festivals, spots in All-State and All-National ensembles, and acceptance into top music schools throughout North America. Published contributions include JazzTimes, JazzEd, and SBO magazines, Teaching Music, the Boston Globe, and music education journals throughout the Northeast. He has presented at music education conferences in MA, VT, NH, PA, and for the NAfME Eastern Division. As a composer, his NYC Jazz Orchestra recording received critical acclaim and designation as one of CD Baby’s top 10 jazz albums of 2009. Schumacher holds a MM in Jazz Studies from NEC. He studied with Bob Brookmeyer and Branford Marsalis.

 

NAfME Creators Corner Council for Music Composition Town Hall – Songwriting and Salvage: Demystifying the Process

January 26, 2022 – 7:00 pm EST

If you are a NAfME member and would like to view this program, contact johnd@nafme.org. 

Are you looking for ways to implement songwriting into your music curriculum? Would you like to encourage your students to put their viewpoint into song? Come join Interlochen Arts Academy songwriting faculty in a fun and interactive one hour songwriting workshop. It will be tailored to meet any age and give you lessons to have in your back pocket to cultivate peer to peer collaboration, learn how to critique others, and plant seeds for the next generation of developing songwriters. There will be time left for Q and A as well as meaningful discussion. This is the second in a series of town hall discussions on creating music in all of its forms that the Council for Music Composition is providing for music educators at all levels.

The presenters are: Courtney Kaiser-Sandler, Josh Davis, and Andrew Dost. Click here to see the presenters’ bios.

 

Council for Band Education Town Hall: Successful Rebuilding from COVID-19      

January 19, 2022 – 7:00 pm EST

If you are a NAfME member and would like to view this program, contact johnd@nafme.org. 

Join NAfME Council for Band Education members who have found success teaching band and connecting with students through COVID-19 in different regions of the country. Speakers will be from the Eastern, Northwestern, and Southwestern parts of the United States. Topics will include the following: Instrument Markings & Mini-Lessons: Setting up Beginners for Success; The Impact of COVID-19 on Classroom Management; and Wind Instrument Fittings in a COVID-19 World.

Speakers: Scott Sheehan, Caitlin Ramsey, Damian Johnson, and Wendy Higdon; Moderator: Martha Damon O’Neill; Closing remarks: Stephen Pickard.

Click here to see the bios and photos of the speakers and moderators.

 

Surviving AND Thriving: Success in the Initial Years

January 12, 2022 – 7:00 pm EST

If you are a NAfME member and would like to view this program, contact johnd@nafme.org. 

 Starting a career in teaching is hard, but not impossible! Learn how to navigate the ups and downs of the first years of teaching and how to lay the foundation for success as a professional throughout your career. Topics addressed will be building positive relationships, developing classroom procedures, getting organized, designing effective instruction, participating in a professional community, and taking care of yourself too. 

Learning objectives: Participants will be able to

  • Understand how cultivating positive relationships with students, families, colleagues, and administration can promote investment into a program and the field.
  • Understand the principles of classroom organization and developing cohesive, effective instruction. Identify processes and resources that can help to ground and feel less overwhelmed.
  • Discuss the importance and mediums for participating in a professional community.
  • Acknowledge the significance of self-care and design a personal plan.

Nicole Davidson is an elementary band and general music teacher in the Copiague School District on Long Island, New York. An active member of the music education community, she has presented workshops and shared her research at the county and state level. Her elementary band was a winner of the News12 ‘Sounds of the Season’ contest and featured on News12 Long Island.  Davidson was recently named a quarterfinalist for the 2022 GRAMMY Music Educator Award. Davidson graduated from the University of Delaware with her Bachelor of Music in Music Education with Honors in May 2017 and her Master of Music Education with Distinction from the Crane School of Music in August 2019. In addition to Music, she holds her teaching certification in Childhood Education (Grades 1-6). In the future, she aspires to continue to share her love of music with her young students and further her education by pursuing Education Policy.

 

Fine-Tune Your Positivity in A Major Way

 December 8, 2021 – 7:00 pm EST

If you are a NAfME member and would like to view this program, contact johnd@nafme.org. 

In this humor-filled and research-based presentation, Peggy Rakas guides us through best practices for music teachers to increase optimism levels and prioritize self-care. It turns out that often a little fine-tuning can have A major effect on our positivity levels. Based on positive psychology, this workshop will examine proven ways to improve happiness levels so teachers and students can be more optimistic, grateful, energetic, motivated, creative, and effective in the classroom. Attendees will receive suggestions for small, sustainable happiness boosters and will go home with engaging ideas, clear goals, practical exercises, and tiny but powerful habits that will motivate all.

Peggy Rakas is a lifelong educator who taught instrumental music for North Merrick Schools on Long Island and is currently a clinician for SmartMusic and an adjunct professor at Hofstra University. She is the founder of Teaching Positivity – an organization that provides positive psychology workshops for educators, and is a certified Optimize Life Coach specializing in positive psychology.  Recently she became an approved instructor for the Yale class for high school students called “Psychology and the Good Life.”  Ms. Rakas is also the founder and coordinator of the Harry Chapin Practice-a-thon, raising money for food banks across New York State. During her career, Ms. Rakas was honored with a nomination for the New York State Teacher of the Year and the Disney Teacher Award.  She was awarded the SCOPE Teacher Service Award and twice selected as the Merrick Kiwanis Club – Teacher of the Year. She is a proud graduate of Bowling Green State University, Ohio and Queens College, New York City.

 

Work Smarter, Not Harder: An Objective Look Within

November 30, 2021 – 7:00 pm EST

If you are a NAfME member and would like to view this program, contact johnd@nafme.org. 

With increased demands on music teachers such as responding to students’ heightened needs during a pandemic, increased physical safety needs related to the pandemic, and the pressures to have concerts again, and new curriculum development, while still teaching students their content, music teachers are increasingly becoming overwhelmed. Therefore, it is vital for music teachers to streamline their program by focusing on the program’s mission, vision, and identity. It is important to realize what is essential to the success of the program and what is extraneous. By revisiting the goal and purpose of the program then focusing only on those tasks that support the mission, music teachers can simplify their role as a music educator through encouragement of support tasks, delegation of items that can be done effectively by someone else, revamping tasks that can promote the mission but do not right now, or discarding those items that do not support the program’s goals.

Learning objectives:  by the end of the webinar, participants will be able to

  • Discuss the purpose and need for an objective overhaul
  • Identify the 2-4 words that encapsulate the mission, vision, and goals for their program
  • View their program from “the outside in” by identifying specific tasks that can be encouraged, delegated, revamped, or eliminated

Christopher Loftin is a Graduate Teaching Assistant and PhD Choral Music Education student at Auburn University. His research focuses on bringing authentic, believable performances to the choral music stage as well as systems of student leadership in the choral ensemble. Christopher holds a Bachelor of Science in Choral Music Education from the University of Alabama and a Master of Education from the University of Montevallo. Christopher is also an active barbershop singer, performer, performance coach, and clinician. He has coached ensembles from the US, Germany, Canada, and Australia. He is a sought-after choral adjudicator, clinician, and festival preparatory consultant.

 

Vocal Health as Self Care for Teachers: How Promoting Vocal Health in Teachers Can Improve Teacher Wellness, Classroom Management, and Foster Student Independence in the Music Classroom 

 November 17, 2021 – 7:00 pm EST

If you are a NAfME member and would like to view this program, contact johnd@nafme.org. 

Vocal health as self care is an incredibly important issue for all educators, since we all use our voice to teach. This webinar will explore why vocal health is so important, how to achieve proper vocal care, and how promoting our own well-being will increase student learning and independence. This is especially relevant this year as teachers are competing with noisy air filters, outdoor traffic, and mask wearing due to COVID-19 protocols. This webinar is supported by the presenter’s own teaching and her coaching of student teachers in the class she teaches as an adjunct at Queens College, and by multiple books that she references as sources in the presentation.

Sara Shikowitz is a proud music educator working in the New York City Department of Education. She serves as the choral director at Halsey Junior High School 157 in Rego Park, Queens. Ms. Shikowitz is a facilitator for the NYC Music Professional Development Series and is a mentor for the NYC Paul Simon Mentor Program. She is the Center Director of the NYC Queens Chorus Salute to Music Program. Ms. Shikowitz is a NYSSMA adjudicator for both solo and major performances. She serves as an adjunct professor of music education at CUNY Queens College. She was a member of and presented her work on the “Best Practices” NYSSMA committee during 2020. She has also presented for the Music Educators Association of New York City (MEANYC). She is the choral coordinator for the MEANYC All County Festival. Sara was a NYC Big Apple Award finalist in 2019. Sara received her Bachelor’s Degree in Music Education from Ithaca College and received her Master’s Degree in Music Education from Queens College.  

 

Building a Legacy: Recruiting Future Music Educators

October 5, 2021 – 7:00 pm EDT

If you are a NAfME member and would like to view this program, contact johnd@nafme.org. 

Leave a long-lasting legacy with the musicians in your ensembles as we explore the relationships between three generations of music educators. We will find out how these music educators have inspired their students to become teachers, what moments have been most powerful in the decision-making process of a future music major, and how the third generation music teacher is passing on the legacy of the first. The musical family tree in our field is strong and our ties to our mentors run deep. As positions become open across the family, more teachers are needed. Join us for this uplifting webinar and prepare to make an exponential impact on students for years to come. Hosted by master educator, clinician, and conductor: Veronica Jackson, this webinar will provide you with ideas for encouraging future music teachers and for building your own legacy. Additional presenters who will be sharing their insights: Ross Winter, University of Central Florida; Lauren Maho, Freshman/Music Education Major, Virginia Commonwealth University;  Anna Puster, College of Wooster; John Puster, Triway Local Schools; Nancy Ditmer, NAfME Past President, College of Wooster; and Brayden Frye, Martin Elementary School, Weakley County Schools. 

Ms. Veronica Jackson studied violin at the University of Miami (FL) with Dr. Marla Meutschler (Paul Rolland protégé) and Dr. Earl Sanders at North Carolina Central University. A 2010 finalist for the R. E. B. Award for Teaching Excellence and Teacher of the Year 2017 for Francis C. Hammond Middle School, Ms. Jackson is now the orchestra director at Alexandria City High School (formerly known as TC Williams High School). Veronica’s innovative and collaborative programming has led to an increase in string enrollment across Alexandria City, national recognition for her outstanding service, and a reputation as a highly sought after conductor and adjudicator.

 

NAfME Creators Corner – Council for Music Composition Town Hall

September 30, 2021 – 7 pm EDT

If you are a NAfME member and would like to view this program, contact johnd@nafme.org. 

This will be the first of a series of town hall discussions on the topics of creating music in all of its forms that the Council for Music Composition will be providing for music educators at all levels. In this kickoff event, members of the Council will hold a roundtable providing their thoughts and techniques of teaching composing, arranging, songwriting, and other creating forms as well as ideas as to how to integrate those techniques into an already-packed musical curriculum. After the roundtable, there will be at least 30 minutes allotted to engage with the audience and hear their questions and ideas on this broad topic. Click here to see the presenter/facilitator photos and bios: Dr. Rob Deemer, Council Chair; Carolyn Bennett; Dr. Mara Gibson; Courtney Kaiser-Sandler; Dr. Xander Koops; Ryan Main; Dr. Cynthia Van Maanen; and Brian Zeller. Join us for this first of many exciting and informational online discussions! 

 

A General Music Town Hall: Suggestions and Answers for Teaching During the 2021-2022 School Year

August 31, 2021 – 7 pm EDT

The majority of schools will be returning to face-to-face instruction during the 2021-2022 school year. After a year of navigating multiple teaching and learning approaches, general music teachers need clear guidance on how to successfully start and maintain general music instruction. Join members of NAfME’s Council for General Music Education, Dr. Rob Lyda, Jennifer Kauffman, Dr. Becky Halliday, and Dr. James Weaver of the NFHS and co-chair of the International Coalition Performing Arts Aerosol Study as they offer suggestions and answer your questions about teaching general music during the 2021-2022 school year. Click here to see the bios of the presenters.

 

Additional Webinar Recordings

 

NEW! – NAfME corporate member Cultural Infusion has created a recorded webinarIntercultural Understanding in the Music Classroom.” Click here to access the webinar recording created by Cultural Infusion.

*Note: Click here to see NAfME’s disclaimer on the virtual learning resources web page about third-party resource links.

 

2020-2021 NAfME Webinar Recordings

 

The selected webinar recordings below were developed by NAfME members and councils during 2020-2021 to support music educators during the most challenging months of the COVID-19 pandemic.  Topics include online teaching, teacher self care, and advocacy.

culturally responsiveUnplugging Generation Z: Neuroscience, Novelty, and Neoteric Strategies in the Choral Rehearsal 
with Jace Kaholokula Saplan

This session unplugs the brains of tech-savvy Generation Z(ers) and provides music educators with culturally-responsive techniques that aid our Generation Z(ers) towards a choral excellence rooted in empathy, cultural consciousness, and critical thinking.

Click here to view the recording

Dr. Jace Kaholokula Saplan serves as the Director of Choral Activities at the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa where he oversees the graduate program in choral conducting and conducts the UH Chamber Singers. Known for his work in celebrating the intersection between Hawaiian music and choral performance, he is the artistic director of Nā Wai Chamber Choir, a professional vocal ensemble based in Hawaiʻi dedicated to the preservation and propagation of Hawaiian choral music. His research focuses on decoloniality and indigeneity within choral musicking, approa

Bridging the Distance:
A Conversation with Collegiate Choral Music Education Students and Current Teachers

Featuring a double panel of current choral conductors at the middle and high school levels and current choral music education students

Moderators: Dean Luethi and Coreen Duffy

Click Here to view the recording.

 

Sarah Ruff Katie Kenkel Nathan Connell   Elizabeth Baker Kimberly Li

 

Jack Bertrand

 

Sarah Ruff was born in Wolverhampton, England. She began her musical studies on piano and violin with the Associated Board of Royal Schools of Music and was a member of the Wolverhampton Youth Symphony and Wolverhampton Grammar School Orchestra. Sarah moved to Miami Florida in 1994 and continued her piano and orchestral studies, graduating from Dillard High School, where she was All State violinist and a Mid-West Clinic participant. During her time in High School, Sarah began composing and arranging for string and vocal ensembles. Sarah is a graduate of the University of Miami (B.M in Music Education, 2003), Nova Southeastern University (M.A. in Humanities, 2009) and Boston University (M.M in Music Education, 2016). Sarah has been a music educator for nearly two decades, teaching multiple disciplines including: piano, violin, guitar, theory, choir and orchestra. In her current position at the Arthur and Polly Mays Conservatory of the Arts, her students have received superior ratings in both orchestra choir, on the district and state levels. The Mays Chorale, under her direction, have been invited to perform at Carnegie Hall, as well as to various events and venues throughout Miami. She regularly arranges and composes for her ensembles. In 2016, Sarah was named one of South Florida’s Top Black Educators by Legacy Magazine as well as Teacher of the Year for the Arthur and Polly Mays Conservatory of the Arts. As a result of this honor, she was also Miami-Dade County Public Schools south region finalist for Teacher of the Year for the entire district. Sarah believes that anyone can learn music and is willing to teach anyone possessing the tenacity required in acquiring the knowledge, skill, and artistic sensitivity for performing music.

Katie Kenkel is the Director of Choral Music at Douglas County High School in Castle Rock, Colorado. She graduated with a bachelor’s degree in music education from Gonzaga University, where she studied voice under Darnelle Preston and conducting under Dr. Timothy Westerhaus. Katie is currently in her second season of performing with Elus Vocal Ensemble based in Denver, Colorado. She will begin pursuing her Masters of Music in Choral Conducting from Florida State University in August 2021.

Nathan Connell is the choral program director at Glacier High School in Kalispell, Montana. He directs five choirs on a daily basis and two after-school choirs. Nathan is also an active percussion educator, currently serving on the staff of the Blue Knights Drum and Bugle Corps out of Denver, Colorado. Nathan enjoys performance engagements in Kalispell, most frequently with the percussion section of the Glacier Symphony Orchestra and serving as a cantor with Risen Christ Church. When he is not teaching or performing he enjoys getting out into the mountains of nearby Glacier National Park. Nathan received dual degrees in music education (choral) and performance (percussion) at Morehead State University in Morehead, Kentucky.

Elizabeth Baker teaches choir and ʻukulele at ʻIlima Intermediate School in ʻEwa Beach, Oʻahu. She recently graduated with her Bachelor of Education in Music Education (Choral) from the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa. Elizabeth serves the Hawaiʻi Chapter of the American Choral Directors Association (ACDA-HI) as the First-Year Membership Coordinator and 6-8 Advocacy Chair. She also serves on the ACDA Western Region Board as the Social Media Coordinator. Additionally, Elizabeth sings with Nā Wai Chamber Choir – an ensemble dedicated to the preservation, propagation, and innovation of Hawaiian choral music, who most recently performed at the 2021 ACDA National Conference.

Kimberly Li is a senior studying Music Education at The University of Nevada, Reno. Currently, she serves as the President of the UNR RenoACDA Chapter, Assistant Conductor of the Nevada Chamber Singers, Alto Section Leader of the Reno First United Methodist Church Chancel Choir, and Choral Director of the Alinea Choir at the Academy of Arts, Careers and Technology High School. 

Jack Bertrand is a candidate for the Master of Music in Choral Conducting at Michigan State University. He received a Bachelor of Music in Instrumental Music Education from Western Michigan University and is Level I certified through the California State University Bakersfield Kodály Institute. Mr. Bertrand previously taught at middle and high schools in Michigan and California including choir, band, general music, and theatre. He is a passionate advocate for the inclusion of music literacy and popular musics in choral curricula. Mr. Bertrand holds membership in the National Association for Music Education, American Choral Directors Association, Michigan School Vocal Music Association, and Jazz Education Network.

Reflect, Restore, Recharge 
with Dr. Matthew Arau

Dr. Matthew Arau will inspire us to REFLECT on how far we have come, RESTORE our self-belief and sense of purpose, and RECHARGE our batteries, passion, and mindset so that, together, we can CREATE a bright future for music education.

Click here to view the recording
 

Dr. Matthew Arau, Founder of Upbeat Global, is an Associate Professor of Music and the Chair of the Music Education Department and Associate Director of Bands at the Lawrence University Conservatory of Music in Appleton, Wisconsin. In addition, Dr. Arau is on the graduate faculty of the American Band College of Central Washington University and VanderCook College of Music. He also serves as a Conn-Selmer Education Clinician and as Member-at-Large on the NAfME Council for Band Education.

Dr. Arau has guest conducted and presented on student leadership, mindfulness, growth mindset, rehearsal techniques, and creating positive cultures in over 25 states and 4 continents in person. He has presented at the International Midwest Band and Orchestra Clinic, the Western International Band Clinic, the NAfME National Conference, numerous State and Regional Music Education Association Conferences, and the Conn-Selmer Institute. He has conducted honor bands in Australia, Greece, Cyprus, and Malaysia, and All-State honor bands across the United States.

Dr. Arau draws on a deep reservoir of fifteen years of experience as a successful middle school and high school band director in Loveland, Colorado, where he led his bands at Walt Clark Middle School and Loveland High School to numerous honor performances and championships and pioneered the Leadership Symposium. Discover more about Dr. Arau at www.upbeatglobal.com.

Best Practices for In-Person Choral Rehearsals During COVID-19
 
 

Five K-12 and collegiate choral directors will discuss their methods for in-person choral rehearsals during COVID. This panel discussion will provide best practices and will also answer your questions. This panel discussion will be moderated by the Chair of the Council for Choral Education, Dean Luethi

 

Aleisa A. Baker is in her 25th year as choral director at T.C. Roberson High School in Asheville North Carolina.  She received her Bachelor of Music degree from Mars Hill University double majoring in music education and vocal performance.  During her tenure at T.C. Roberson, her choirs consistently receive superior ratings at state and national festivals and competitions and represent their school and community at many events in and around the Asheville Area. In addition to her responsibilities as choral director at T.C. Roberson High School, Mrs. Baker serves as the colorguard instructor and show designer for the T.C. Roberson Marching Band.  She also is director for the school-wide musical each spring having produced over 26 musicals in her career. Among her favorites are The Secret Garden, The Drowsy Chaperone, The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee and Spamalot (regional premier).  She also currently serves as Zone Coordinator for the Mars Hill University Choral Festival as well as serves as an adjudicator for choral and marching band competition in North Carolina and neighboring states. Mrs. Baker’s professional affiliations include the National Association for Music Education and the American Choral Directors Association. Recently she was elected Chair-Elect for the High School Choral Section of the North Carolina Music Educators Association.

Coreen Duffy is director of choral activities at the University of Montana School of Music, where she conducts Chamber Chorale and University Choir, teaches conducting, choral methods, and supervises student teachers. Duffy is an active clinician and composer; her works are published by Walton Music, ECS, and Pavane. A specialist in Jewish choral music, Duffy has presented on the subject at national and international conferences, including in Hannover, Germany in 2019. Duffy currently serves as NW Division Representative for the NAfME Council for Choral Education, as well as NW ACDA Repertoire & Resource Co-Chair for World Musics and Cultures, as well as and on the Editorial Board for NCCO’s The Choral Scholar.

Bethany Jennings, Choral Director at Stuart W. Cramer High School in Belmont, North Carolina, holds a Master of Music degree from the University of Mississippi (Ole Miss) and a Bachelor of Music Education from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro where she attended as a NC Teaching Fellow. In addition to her work at Stuart Cramer, Bethany serves as Director of Music Ministries for the First Presbyterian Church in Gastonia, NC. She is the founder of North Carolina’s Collegiate Choral Symposium held each fall and the Carolinas Conductor Summer Workshop.  Most recently, along with four additional US delegates, Bethany was awarded the honor of representing the American Choral Directors Association in Johannesburg, South Africa to study as an International Conducting Fellow.  Her professional affiliations include ACDA, PAM, Choristers Guild, NafME, and just completed a term serving as Chair of the High School Choral Section within the NC Music Educators Association. Bethany’s interests in the classroom include music literacy & assessment, and technology integration in the classroom. Outside of the classroom she enjoys being Aunt Beth, coaching basketball, and will eat anything but lima beans.

Shermie Potts is the Head Coral Director and Fine Arts Chair Edmond Santa Fe High School. She holds a Bachelors of Music Education (OU), a Masters of Music Education (UCO), and a PhD in Music Education (OU). Her special passion is teaching singers to sight-sing and has developed an aural-based sight-singing method used with success by many teachers in Oklahoma. She directs Advanced Women’s Chorus, Men’s Chorus, and the show choir, Finale’, for which she arranges music and creates choreography.  She also co-directs the annual school variety show, Debut, and a full Broadway musical. Potts has served as the Choral Vice-President of the Oklahoma Music Educators Association and OkMEA Treble Chorus All-State Choir Chair. She has also served as the Repertoire and Standards Chair for Male Choirs for the Oklahoma Choral Directors Association. Potts currently serves as the High School Chair for Central Oklahoma Choral Directors Association.

Stefanie Weigand currently serves as a member of the NAfME Council for Choral Education and Youth Choir R&R for ACDA’s Eastern Region. She has also served as President and Membership Chair of the VT-ACDA. She enjoys working as a presenter, clinician, and guest conductor across the region and is currently the choral director at Harwood Union Middle and High School in central Vermont where she teaches MS and HS chorus, acting, and conducts two honors ensembles (I Cantori and Harwood Vocal Jazz). During the summer, Stefanie teaches graduate courses for inservice music educators through Music-COMP both online and in person. She was the 2014 recipient of the VMEA’s Outstanding New Music Educator Award. After receiving her BFA in Musical Theatre from Ithaca College, Stefanie toured nationally with a Children’s Theatre Company and worked on stage and off as a performer, pit musician, and music director. Since moving to Vermont, she has appeared as a vocalist, pianist, and music director for various organizations including TURNmusic, the Vermont Philharmonic, Stowe Theatre Guild, Lyric Theatre, Music-COMP, the Green Mountain Mahler Festival, Burlington Civic Symphony Orchestra, and the Green Mountain Opera Festival. Stefanie’s work as a studio vocalist can also be heard on a number of albums released through Lane Gibson studios and Lovetown Recording. She now enjoys living in the district where she teaches, and where her two young daughters attend school, as she completes her own graduate studies at Castleton University.

Dr. Dean Luethi is Director of Choral Activities, Director of the School of Music, and an Associate Professor at Washington State University. Prior to his work at WSU, Dean worked at the University of South Florida and was a public-school music teacher. He received his Doctor of Musical Arts degree in Choral Music from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, his Master of Music degree in Choral Conducting from the University of South Florida in Tampa, and his Bachelor of Music degree in Vocal Music Education from the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay. Dean has presented research or performed in Austria, Cuba, China, Hawaii, India, Canada, and Poland. He is sought after as a guest conductor, adjudicator, and clinician and has been published in Choral Journal and Music Educators Journal. His recent set of books Aligning Voices: Exercises To Build Choral Musicianship is published by GIA. Dean enjoys amateur photography and lives with his wife, Ruth Boden, and their two cats.

 

Aerosol Study Round 3 Results Update

 
Join the co-chair researcher on the International Performing Arts Aerosol Research Study to learn about the latest research results and suggestions on how to make music together safely in-person.
 
 
Dr. James Weaver is the Director of Performing Arts and Sports for the National Federation of High School State Associations. As the director of performing arts and sports. Dr. Weaver oversees student participation, professional development, and awareness of performing arts activities throughout the nation’s 19,500+ high schools. He works to create partnerships with national arts organizations to create a robust advocacy network that impacts music, speech, debate, theatre, and academic competitions for all schools, and to increase access to these programs in underserved student populations. James has been a teacher and administrator at the district, state, and national level.

Teaching Students with Disabilities during COVID-19
By Alice Hammel

How do we adapt teaching for students with disabilities during COVID-19? How do we remove barriers to accessibility? Some adaptation strategies can be utilized with technology to improve accessibility of materials. We also understand how anxiety in this time can be magnified in students who access the world differently. Finally, we all remember that the relationships we have with our students and our openness to helping them learn in their own way are primary considerations.

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Dr. Alice Hammel, Virginia Music Educator Association Outstanding Educator (2018) and current President Elect of the Virginia Music Educators Association, is a widely known music educator, author, and clinician whose experience in music is extraordinarily diverse. She is a member of the faculty of James Madison University, and has many years of experience teaching instrumental and choral music in public and private schools. Dr. Hammel has put these varied experiences to great use while compiling a large body of scholarly work. She is a co-author for four texts: Teaching Music to Students with Special Needs: A Label-free Approach, Teaching Music to Students with Autism, Winding It Back: Teaching to Individual Differences in Music Classroom and Ensemble Settings, and Teaching Music to Students with Special Needs: A Practical Resource. Dr. Hammel is President of the Council for Exceptional Children – Division for Visual and Performing Arts Education.

Music Education and SEL During COVID-19:
Resiliency and Empathy Now More Than Ever
By Scott Edgar

Music teachers and their classrooms are often the social and emotional foundation for our students. Much of the current discussion is about how to replicate this work online. This is impossible to replicate and it is missing an opportunity to capitalize on this unique situation. Our concern needs to be balancing music education with the social emotional health of our students. Join us as we discuss how to stress the importance of SEL during this challenging time.

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Additional resources for asynchronous learning:

Dr. Scott N. Edgar is in his seventh year as Associate Professor of Music, Music Education Chair, and Director of Bands at Lake Forest College. He received his Doctorate of Philosophy in Music Education from the University of Michigan, his Masters degree in Education from the University of Dayton, and his Bachelor of Music in Music Education degree from Bowling Green State University. His previous teaching experience in higher education includes work at Adrian College and Concordia College Ann Arbor. Prior to his work in higher education he taught K-12 instrumental music in Ohio and Michigan. Dr. Edgar is the author of Music Education and Social Emotional Learning: The Heart of Teaching Music and is an internationally sought-after clinician on the topic. In addition to clinics, he also teaches graduate courses on Musical Social Emotional Learning at VanderCook College of Music. He is an active clinician and adjudicator for both concert band and marching band, and regularly presents at professional development and research conferences. Dr. Edgar is a Conn-Selmer Educational Clinician and VH1 Save the Music Foundation Educational Consultant. Dr. Edgar is a member of the National Association for Music Education, the American Educational Research Association, the College Music Society, Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia Music fraternity and Kappa Kappa Psi Band fraternity. He lives in Lake Villa with his wife Steph, their son Nathan, and their cats Elsa and Wolfie.

Music – Thinking Differently – It’s Not About a Virtual Ensemble
By Meghan Cabral

During this unprecedented time many people are trying to recreate the ensemble experience for our students. While we all want to create these musical experiences, we should begin thinking differently and bring our focus back to our roots — creating music because we love music. It isn’t about the virtual ensemble, it IS about our students and creating lifelong musicians.

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Meghan Cabral is currently the District Director of Music for the Carmel Central School District. She is the director of the High School Wind Ensemble as well as High School Freshman Band. In addition to her director and teaching duties at Meghan acts as the middle school’s Professional Growth Coordinator. Meghan’s bands have received Gold and Gold with Distinction ratings at NYSSMA major’s festivals. Her students have been selected for NYSBDA honors band. Meghan began the George Fischer Middle School Clarinet Choir and in its second year, was selected to perform at the New Jersey Music Educator’s Conference. Meghan stays active as an author for Music Education Publications. One of her most recent article was published in the February 2019 edition of The Instrumentalist titled, “Flipping the Music Classroom.” Her first article was published in The Instrumentalist magazine in March 2009, titled “Balance Goals with Experience.” Meghan in 2019 was invited to present at the Midwest International Band and Orchestra Clinic on the “Mystery of the Clarinet High Notes.” She remains an active presenter as well as contributing journalist. Her articles have been published in the Instrumentalist Magazine, Music Educator’s Journal, NYSBDA’s Band Stand, NYSSMA’s School Music News, NJMEA’s Tempo Magazine, School Band and Orchestra Magazine, as well as on many blogs including NAfME’s educator’s blog, Smart Music Blog, and Band Director’s Talk Shop. In addition to her article contributions Meghan was a 2017 Grammy Music Educator Semifinalist. In addition to the Midwest Clinic, Meghan has presented numerous times at conferences including the Ithaca College MENC sponsored College Conference, the Connecticut Music Educator’s Conference, New Jersey’s Music Educator’s Association State Conference, as well as the NYSSMA All-State conference. Meghan is a contributor to the NAfME’s online academy for Music Professional Development. Meghan currently is serving as the NYSSMA Zone 10 Representative. Meghan’s private students have been accepted into Area All-State, NYSBDA middle and high school honors band, NYSSMA All-State, NAfME sponsored All-Nationals Ensemble, in addition to being accepted at many top colleges. Meghan has served as guest conductor for countless All-County, Region, District as well as Area All State festivals and is co-founder of the Arts on the Lake Summer Band Camp in Carmel, NY.

Promoting and Preserving Your Music Programs during Covid-19 Times
by Mary Wagner and Jenna Day

Join two successful advocates as they give you tips and strategies to save and promote your program. Times are tough but there are many things you can do that will only strengthen your program. This webinar will help you get started!

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Mary Wagner was a string orchestra teacher in the Fairfax County Public Schools for 39 years where she taught elementary, middle and high school students. While working full-time, she mentored new string orchestra teachers and participated as a member of the curriculum writing team. She also chaired the very active Fairfax Arts Coalition for Education. Wagner served as a past-president of the American String Teachers Association where she chaired the Advocacy committee, served as the Articles Editor of the American String Teacher and chaired many ASTA Conferences. She was a contributing member of the ASTA national curriculum writing team which wrote The ASTA String Curriculum published by Alfred Music.

Jenna Day, owns Day Violins LLC, a full-service string shop in Northern Virginia. She became interested in Music Education Advocacy when the Fairfax County Budget was in jeopardy when two of her children were young. She currently serves as the president for the Oakton Orchestra Boosters at Oakton High School, Parent Liaison for FACE (Fairfax Arts Coalition for Education), on the Arts Advisory Board for The Academy at George Mason, Co-Chair for the Mason Academy Parents Group (MAP) and The Arts Advisory Board for Arts at Mason at George Mason University. She is an active member of NAMM (National Association of Music Merchandisers) and travels every year to Washington, DC to advocate for music education at the national level.

Moving Music Online: Successful Models and Advice
By John Mlynczak and Patrick Benson

As we work to provide relevant and practical online instruction for our students, there are several models we can adapt. From live teaching, to small group meetings, to complete asynchronous instruction, each circumstance has its benefits and challenges. This webinar will demonstrate examples of various online course structures while providing tips and advice for each model.

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John Mlynczak offers an extensive range of experiences in music education and the music industry and is a frequent national clinician. Mr. Mlynczak is Managing Director of Noteflight, a Hal Leonard company, and Past-president of the Technology Institute of Music Educators. John also teaches Graduate courses at VanderCook College and Boston University Online, and a Google Level-2 Certified Educator. Mr. Mlynczak is a passionate advocate for music education and technology, serving on the NAMM State Advocacy Coalition, the NAfME Advocacy Leadership Force, and is Advocacy Chairman for the Massachusetts Music Educators Association. Mr. Mlynczak holds degrees in music education, music performance, and educational leadership.

Patrick Benson (BMEd ‘08) joined the administration of VanderCook in July 2015 as the director of continuing and online education. In addition to teaching and working at VanderCook, Benson is an active percussionist and drummer in the Chicagoland area. He has also served as a staff member for the Midwest Band & Orchestra Clinic for 16 years.

Leadership at the Local Level: Make Your Voice Heard
By Scott Sheehan, Mackie Spradley, Kathleen Sanz, and Denese Odegaard

As we head toward summer, music teachers across the nation must talk with their administrators, parent groups, colleagues, students, and their community about the importance of music education and what modifications may take place when we return to our classrooms. NAfME leaders will share important work that has been happening behind the scenes and how to tap into NAfME’s many resources. This session will provide a solutions-minded framework for local advocacy.

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President-Elect

 

Kathleen Sanz, NAfME President for 2018-2020, received her B.A. and M.A. in Music Education from the University of South Florida, and her Ph.D. in Music Education from the University of Colorado. Presently she is the President and CEO of the Center for Fine Arts Education in Tallahassee, Florida. Prior to that Dr. Sanz served as the Supervisor of Curriculum and Instructional Services and Co-Directed the District School Board of Pasco County Curriculum Department from 2007-2011. From 1985-2006 she supervised the Fine Arts at the K-12 level. Her past teaching experience includes 8 years as a music educator at the elementary level. Dr. Sanz has been instrumental throughout her career in curriculum and assessment development and implementation at both the district and state level.

Mackie V. Spradley serves as the Director of Enrichment Education at the Texas Education Agency in Austin, TX. She is also an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Teacher Education and Administration, College of Education, at the University of North Texas (UNT), Denton, Texas. She received the B.M. in Voice from UNT and M.A. in Vocal Pedagogy from Texas Woman’s University, Denton. She received her Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction with an emphasis in Anthropology from UNT. Spradley has published in academic journals and books, such as the National Forum of Multicultural Issues Journal, Texas Music Educators Conference Connections and Educational Leadership and Music (in press). She is a national speaker on music education, culturally responsive pedagogy, and social justice.

Denese Odegaard, NAfME Past-President (2018-2020), is currently retired as the Fargo (North Dakota) Public Schools Performing Arts Curriculum Specialist, and taught orchestra for 35 years. National service includes board member for both the American String Teachers Association (ASTA) and the National Association for Music Education (NAfME). Her involvement in NAfME includes serving as North Central President and Research Advisor for the 3-5 grade standards writing team. She served as President of the North Dakota Music Educators Association (NDMEA) and was Executive Director for ten years.

A nationally recognized advocate and leader for the advancement of music education, Scott Sheehan is the Director of Bands and Music Department Chairperson at the Hollidaysburg Area Senior High School in Hollidaysburg, PA. Mr. Sheehan will become the NAfME National President-Elect in June (2020-2022), is an Educational Clinician for Conn-Selmer, and was a finalist for the 2019 GRAMMY Music Educator Award. He is also a consultant for strategic planning and association development for music education programs across the country. He is currently the Program Chair for the NAfME All-National Honors Ensembles. As an active member of the PMEA, Scott has served as State President, as well as a District President and Curriculum and Instruction State Representative.

Walking the Talk: Working with Administrators During COVID-19 and Beyond
By Leyla Sanyer

We will explore the use of progressive vocabulary, student centered concepts/comprehensive, and standards based learning to demonstrate advocacy in a new educational environment. While many things have changed, a lot is still possible and we can keep to our principles about teaching music while shifting to a new landscape of Every Student Succeeds Act. Join us to examine a shift in the paradigm and practical ways to engage the decision makers and stakeholders.

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Leyla Sanyer has forty-two years of teaching experience most recently teaching orchestra and music composition at Oregon High School (WI). She has been chair of the Comprehensive Musicianship through Performance committee, a member of the Wisconsin Challenging Content Standards Task Force, WSMA State Honors Music Project orchestra coordinator, treasurer of WSTA, and Orchestra Chair for WMEA. She is currently immediate past president of the National Association for Music Education North Central Division, past president of the Wisconsin Music Educators Association, and WMEA Standards Chair.

Why Should I Care about Advocacy?
By Lynn Brinckmeyer

 

Does the word “advocacy” make you want to turn around and run the other direction? Explore practical strategies for effective and user-friendly advocacy that can be implemented right away in your home, your school, your community, and your state. Take these ideas and begin advocating for our students’ and their right to music education in all schools in every state. Now, more than ever, it is our responsibility to step up and take action.

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Dr. Lynn Brinckmeyer, Director of Choral Music Education-Texas State University, was National President for The National Association for Music Education in 2006-2008. She recently authored Advocate for Music, and co-authored The Wonder of Music, with John Jacobson. Dr. Brinckmeyer teaches choral music education and directs the Texas State Aurora Voce and the Hill Country Youth Chorus. She currently serves as co-chair of the American Choral Directors Association Advocacy and Collaboration Committee.

Music Advocacy: Moving from Survival to Vision
By John Benham

 

As if a variety of reform movements and budget crises over the last several decades haven’t caused enough threats to music programs, we now find ourselves in the middle of another. How do we as educators confront these issues? Based on a philosophy that all students deserve a music education, this webinar will provide you with specific tools and strategies to address these and future issues.

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John Benham is author of Music Advocacy: Moving from Survival to Vision. His area of expertise is building, saving, and restoring music programs. His background includes over 40 years as a music teacher from elementary through university levels. In addition, he is the proprietor of his own music instrument repair business and has served two terms as a school board member.

His personal knowledge and experience provide unique understanding to help you go before a school board and administration with language they understand and methods that work. He has taken his message from coast to coast in the United States and Canada. His methods are responsible for building, saving and restoring over $75 million in budgetary funds in music, leading to the restoration of over 1,000 teaching positions and the continuation of music programs for over 500,000 students.

Advocating for Music Education Utilizing Social-Emotional Learning
By Scott Edgar and Bob Morrison

SEL is a construct implemented across the globe providing students with skills to confront challenges by being self-aware, socially-aware, and to make responsible decisions. SEL is a widely-accepted construct that policy makers at all levels value and will be paramount for our administrators. SEL can provide a solution to help our students cope, heal, and move forward. Join us as we discuss strategies to advocate for music education utilizing SEL.

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Scott Edgar headshot

 

Dr. Scott Edgar is Associate Professor of Music, Music Education Chair, and Director of Bands at Lake Forest College. Scott is the author of Music Education and Social Emotional Learning: The Heart of Teaching Music and is an internationally sought-after clinician on the topic. He is a Conn-Selmer Educational Clinician and VH1 Save the Music Foundation Educational Consultant.

Bob Morrison is the founder of Quadrant Arts Education Research, the nation’s leading arts education research and intelligence organization. He is a deeply accomplished executive offering a 25-year record of repeated success as CEO/Executive Director of several organizations and as visionary and driving force behind creation and launch of groundbreaking non-profits. Mr. Morrison’s leadership in research, public policy and advocacy efforts has led to significant advancements in access to music and arts education programs across the nation.

Discussing the Diversification of State Repertoire Lists

Council for Music Composition Chair Rob Deemer will host a conversation on the rationales and best practices behind diversifying state repertoire lists with those who have been working on this initiative through organizations like On The List and the Institute for Composer Diversity as well as those who would be impacted. Guests include Dr. Brandon Houghtalen, Amy Rever-Oberle, Dr. Cory Meals, Cecilia Clark, and Dr. Quincy Hilliard.

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composer database

 

Rob Deemer is a composer, conductor, educator, author, and advocate. His works have been commissioned and performed by the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra, the President’s Own Marine Band, the U.S. Army Orchestra, the University of Texas and UMKC wind ensembles, Rasçher Saxophone Quartet, loadbang, Akropolis Reed Quintet, and Gaudete Brass Quintet. He is the founder and project director of the Composer Diversity Project and has written extensively for NewMusicBox. Deemer is a Professor and Head of Composition at the State University of New York at Fredonia, the State Chair of the NYSSMA Composition/Improvisation Committee, and the National Chair of the NAfME Council for Music Composition.

Cecilia Clark, Director of Bands at Allatoona High School in Acworth, Georgia, is from Upper Marlboro, MD. Ms. Clark’s professional experience includes Assistant Band Director at McEachern High School in Powder Springs, GA where she assisted with all band operations, conducted Symphonic Band, sponsored Color Guard, and taught Music Theory and Piano classes. Ms. Clark also served as Fine Arts Department Chair.

Quincy C. Hilliard’s compositions for wind band are published by variety of well known major music publishers and have been performed throughout the world. His reputation as a respected composer is apparent as he is frequently commissioned to write new compositions and has been a numerous recipient of the distinguished American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP) award recognizing the unusually frequent performances of his works. He was also chosen as one of a select group of composers to write music for the 1996 Olympics.

Amy spent seven years as the K-12 Band and Music teacher before moving to her current position as the 6th-8th Band Teacher at Hart Middle School in Rochester Hills, MI. Amy has been a regular presenter at the Michigan Music Conference, hosting sessions on utilizing technology in band, social media for the classroom, Genius Hour, and selecting music by diverse composers. Amy was a clinician at the 2018 Orange County Music Education Association Multi County Conference in New York to host sessions on Google Classroom and Social Media and conduct a reading session.

Dr. Brandon Houghtalen serves as the Associate Director of Bands and Assistant Professor of Music at Abilene Christian University in Abilene, Texas. Additionally, he serves as conductor of the Wind Ensemble of the Tennessee Governor’s School for the Arts and as hornist of the Key City Winds. In 2018 Houghtalen founded the On the List Project, a group of teachers that assists states as they work to make their required music lists more inclusive.

Cory Meals teaches undergraduate courses in secondary instrumental music education focusing on band and graduate courses in music education research. Dr. Meals’ research interests include equity and diversity in music education, perception and cognition of gesture in music, individual and ensemble pedagogy, and preservice teacher preparation.

Teaching General Music during COVID-19: Changing our focus to creating, responding, and connecting
By Becky Halliday, Phil Wilson, and Rob Lyda

As music teachers wrap up the 2019-2020 school year there are many unknowns about what the future of general music will look like. With a myriad of possibilities and constraints, how will and how can we effectively teach students music? This series of webinars will examine teaching general music from multiple music education approaches. Using the 2014 National Standards as a framework, music teachers will be provided with ideas and possible solutions to teaching general music during COVID-19.

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Becky Halliday is an Assistant Professor of Music at the University of Montevallo, where she teaches courses related to teacher preparation, primarily in the area of early childhood music. In addition, she is the director of the University of Montevallo Kodály Institute, and a co-director of the Young Musicians’ Camp. Dr. Halliday has served as Higher Education President of AMEA and was a founding member of the Sweet Home Alabama Kodály Educators (SHAKE) chapter of OAKE.

Phil R. Wilson the music teacher at Ogletree Elementary School in Auburn, Alabama, where he has taught for the past 18 years. In 2010, Phil became a National Board Certified Teacher in the area of Early and Middle Childhood Music. He is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in Music Education from Auburn University. Phil is the 2010-2011 Alabama State Teacher of the Year.

Rob Lyda is the music teacher at Cary Woods Elementary in Auburn, AL and an adjunct instructor of music at Auburn University. Dr. Lyda has earned certification in Kodály, World Music Drumming, TI:ME, is an Orff-Schulwerk (Levels I-III) certified teacher and holds Master Level Certification in Orff-Schulwerk. Dr. Lyda regularly presents sessions and research on technology integration, creativity, and general music education at state, regional, and national conferences. Currently, Dr. Lyda serves as the Chair of NAfME’s Council for General Music Education, President-Elect of the AMEA, and Advocacy Chair of the AMEA.

A Framework for Teaching General Music During COVID-19
By David Frego, Tiffany Taylor-English, Jennifer Donovan, and Rob Lyda

 

As music teachers wrap up the 2019-2020 school year there are many unknowns about what the future of general music will look like. With a myriad of possibilities and constraints, how will and how can we effectively teach students music? This series of webinars will examine teaching general music from multiple music education approaches. Using the 2014 National Standards as a framework, music teachers will be provided with ideas and possible solutions to teaching general music during COVID-19.  

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David Frego is professor and director of the School of Music at Penn State. Frego is past president of the American Eurhythmics Society and the Dalcroze Society of America, and regularly presents workshops on Dalcroze Eurhythmics throughout the globe. While performing artists of all ages benefit from rhythmic training, eurhythmics in teacher training is an important focus of Dr. Frego’s research. Other teaching and research areas include dance philosophy and the application of Dalcroze Eurhythmics as palliative care for adults with post-traumatic stress.

Tiffany English is the music specialist at Sugar Hill Elementary School in Gwinnett County, Georgia. She holds multiple degrees from the University of Georgia and Piedmont College. Her education also includes post-Level III Orff Schulwerk teacher education and Level I Kodály training. Tiffany has served AOSA as Region IV representative on the National Board of Trustees, vice president and president of AOSA, chair of the Professional Development Committee, president of the Atlanta Area Orff Chapter, and co-chair for the 2014 and 2021 AOSA Professional Development Conferences. 

Jennifer Donovan teaches at Clear Creek Elementary School in Shawnee, Kansas. She is a past president of the Kansas Orff Chapter and has served on the AOSA National Board of Trustees as Region Representative and Treasurer. She served as National Conference Chair for the 2016 AOSA Conference and is serving in the same position for the 2020 AOSA Conference in Kansas City. She teaches Orff Level 1 Pedagogy at Baker University as well as Recorder at University of Nevada Las Vegas. She is currently serving on the Kansas State Department of Education Learning for the Future Task Force comprised of 100 educators in all disciplines and levels who are designing curriculum in the event of school closures in the 2020-2021 school year.

Rob Lyda is the music teacher at Cary Woods Elementary in Auburn, AL and an adjunct instructor of music at Auburn University. Dr. Lyda has earned certification in Kodály, World Music Drumming, TI:ME, is an Orff-Schulwerk (Levels I-III) certified teacher and holds Master Level Certification in Orff-Schulwerk. Dr. Lyda regularly presents sessions and research on technology integration, creativity, and general music education at state, regional, and national conferences. Currently, Dr. Lyda serves as the Chair of NAfME’s Council for General Music Education, President-Elect of the AMEA, and Advocacy Chair of the AMEA.

State Advocacy: Success Stories and Best Practices from the States

NAfME’s affiliated state associations have been successful in advocating for music education in their states. For this webinar, we’ve invited some of those states to share their strategies with us, to take us through their process of action, and to share what they learned. Join us and learn advocacy best practices from your colleagues!

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Preparing Online Learning Opportunities for Students
By Nancy Garvey

This webinar will focus on resources, strategies, and tangible ideas that all educators in this new online world are encouraged to borrow. Nancy will share Coppell ISD’s journey and lessons learned in an effort to help others build success while designing for online learning. Come with your questions, and your own ideas to share in the chat box to learn more about how CISD began to prepare for the unknown.

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Nancy is in her sixth year as Director of Digital Learning. She worked in Digital Learning for Coppell ISD from 2004 – 2014 before being hired as the Director. She began her career as a teacher in Coppell, Texas; she later became a Digital Learning Coach at various campuses in Coppell. In the 10 years she worked as a DLC, she worked at elementary, middle and high school campuses which gave her a multi-level experience that helped form a more holistic view of what digital learning looks like PreK – 12. When not at work, Nancy enjoys spending time with her family, photography, and travelling.

Social Distancing, Sanitation, and Carts, Oh My! Suggestions and Strategies for Teaching General Music on a Cart.

Music educators are facing many challenges as they return for the 2020-2021 school year.  One thing many teachers are tentative about is being a traveling music teacher and teaching “on a cart”. Participants in this session will hear from expert music educators that have successfully navigated the challenge of teaching on a cart.  After short presentations of best practice, the clinicians will answer your questions.

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Amy Walworth is the elementary music specialist for Macon County Public schools, in Lafayette TN. She is the only music instructor for over 1000 K-5 students and teaches at 5 different schools during the year. She travels to every class using a cart and is the author of the new book Teaching on A Cart which includes strategies, encouragement and a full curriculum for music cart teachers.

Danielle Ingram is entering her 15th year teaching preschool through 4th grade general music and chorus in Little Falls, NJ. She also serves as a Clinical Educator, District Mentor, and has presented at multiple state music teachers conferences on a variety of topics including curriculum creation, classroom management, and teaching music from a cart. Ms. Ingram received a Bachelor of Music in Music Education from the University of Delaware and a Master of Music in Piano Performance and Pedagogy from Westminster Choir College in Princeton, NJ. She is the creator and content writer for www.MusicOnACart.com and welcomes all correspondence.

Melissa Stouffer is the music teacher at a small school in Michigan where she teaches preschool through 5th grade general music, elementary choir as well as the middle school band and choir programs which she founded while teaching on a cart. She has a BS in Psychology and BME in Music Education from Central Michigan University and is Kodály Level Two certified. She serves as the past-president of the Michigan Kodály Educators as well as the MMC Planning Committee representative for the Michigan Music Educators Association. She is a frequent presenter and the creator and author of www.mrsstouffersmusicroom.com.

Rob Lyda is the music teacher at Cary Woods Elementary in Auburn, AL and an adjunct instructor of music at Auburn University.  Currently, Dr. Lyda serves as the Chair of NAfME’s Council for General Music Education, President-Elect and Advocacy Chair of the Alabama MEA. 

Model Cornerstone Assessments: They Can Work for Your Program
By Fred Burrack

The National Standards for Music Education are best understood through integration into your curriculum and assessing the development of student learning using the rubrics with the activities in your music program’s curriculum. This webinar will help you use the standards’ assessment rubrics to identify progress in music learning progress through adapting the Model Cornerstone Assessment frameworks into your curriculum.

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Frederick Burrack is Director of Assessment, Professor of Music Education, Graduate Chair for Music, Distinguished Graduate Faculty. He has served as the Chair for the National Association for Music Education Assessment Special Research Interest Group and as Co-Chair for their work in developing Model Cornerstone Assessments that accompany the National K-12 Music Standards. His co-edited book “Applying Model Cornerstone Assessments in K–12 Music: A research supported approach” was published in 2018 and new text for assessing music published in 2020 with co-authors Dr. Kelly Parkes, Dr. Phillip Payne, and Dr. Brian Wesolowski. 

Mariachi Guitar and Vihuela Strumming Teaching Online
by Ramon Rivera

Teaching Mariachi online can be a challenge and this webinar will give you some easy ways to teach Mariachi rhythms for middle school to high school beginner Mariachi students. Teaching Mariachi strumming and other resources will assist with your online teaching in the fall. In this workshop, you can play along with your Guitar, Vihuela, or Guitarron. If you are new to playing Mariachi music, this would be a great workshop for you. Viva Mariachi!

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Click here to access more than 100 music assignments.

Ramon Rivera, Mariachi Educator, Education Consultant 

From handwritten thank you notes from parents and students to being honored by the Speaker of the House, Ramon Rivera has been recognized as being an innovative leader and pioneer in cultural arts and has received numerous awards and accolades during his teaching career. He is currently the Mount Vernon School District Mariachi Program Director in Mount Vernon, Washington. He currently teaches 6 Mariachi and Folklorico classes with a total enrollment of over 200 students grades 6-12. Mr. Rivera also has written five published blogs for NAFME about Mariachi Education led Mariachi Education workshops for many companies and universities. 

Opening the 2020-2021 School Year: What Are Strategies for Success?
by Annamarie Bollino, Dr. Heather Cote, Martha Gabel, Dr. Lance Nielsen, Michael Stone, and Dr. Marcheta Williams
Friday, August 28 at 1:00 ET

The start of this school year will be like none we have experienced as music educators. What are some of the strategies and plans that will help us reimagine and operationalize music education in the world of virtual learning, hybrid instruction, and eventual face-to-face instruction? This panel of experienced music program leaders will share goals and objectives, challenges, and successes as we all keep our focus on student learning in music this fall.

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Click here to view the PowerPoint document.

 

 

Annamarie Bollino currently serves as the Facilitator of Fine & Performing Arts for Stafford County Public Schools where she oversees all aspects of arts programming and curricula. She enjoys leading adult learning and has varied experiences teaching Prek-K through graduate level students. Annamarie holds masters degrees in music education and educational leadership and is currently pursuing  a Ph.D. in Music Education. As of July 1, Annamarie will become President of the Virginia Music Educators Association (VMEA) and currently serves on the NAfME Council of Music Program Leaders. 

Dr. Lance Nielsen is the Supervisor of Music for Lincoln Public Schools in Lincoln, Nebraska. He is a past-president of the NAfME North Central Division and past president of the Nebraska Music Education Association. He currently serves on various arts education committees within Nebraska.

Michael D. Stone serves as the Visual and Performing Arts Coordinator for the Bakersfield City School District (BCSD).  Under his leadership, BCSD was named a Best Communities for Music Education Award Winner 2013-2020 by the National Association of Music Merchants.  Mr. Stone is the Chair of the National Association for Music Education Council of Music Program Leaders.  A graduate of UCLA, he taught instrumental music at Chipman Junior High 

Dr. Marcheta Williams is the Visual and Performing Arts Director for the Madera Unified School District in Madera, California.  She oversees programing for the arts for the 20,000 K-12 students within the district.  A former K-12 music and theatre arts teacher, a site administrator- K-12, she provides a wealth of experience and knowledge.  Dr. Williams is proud of the district’s accomplishments, receiving the distinction of Best Community for Music Education Award Winner 2017-2020.  She is a graduate of the Cincinnati Conservatory, BM, University of Southern California, MMEd and UC Berkeley, Ed.D.  She is on the Board of California Alliance for Arts Education.School before becoming an administrator.  Mr. Stone is an experienced adjudicator and guest conductor of honor bands and orchestras.

Martha Gabel has been a music educator for 34 years, teaching elementary General Music and most recently serving as the Fine Arts Coordinator for the Olathe Public Schools. She holds a BME from University of Missouri-Kansas City, an MLA – Education, and an MS in School Leadership, both from Baker University. Martha has served the Kansas Music Educators Association as the State Elementary Chair, President-Elect, President, and currently holds the position of the Immediate Past President. She is also the Southwestern Division representative on the NAfME Council of Music Program Leaders.

Dr. Heather Cote is the Director of Performing Arts for the Westwood Public Schools in Westwood, MA. She holds a Bachelors degree in Music Education, a Masters degree in Theater Education and a D.M.A in Music Education. Dr. Cote has taught vocal, general and instrumental music at all levels, and currently conducts the Westwood High School bands. She has presented at many state conferences and workshops. A 2019 Lowell Mason Award Winner, Dr. Cote is President-Elect for the Massachusetts Music Educators Association and Chair of NAfME’s Music Program Leaders Council.

 

Supporting Young Children’s Social and Emotional Learning through Music Activity
By Lili M. Levinowitz

Lili M. Levinowitz headshotHealthy social-emotional skills in early childhood are considered the foundation for school readiness and later school success. Music education curriculum components not only support music development but are naturally supportive tools for social and emotional learning in early childhood.

Participants will be introduced to important dimensions of social and emotional skills, and experience music activities that support them, even if delivered in an online format. Music educators will gain a deeper understanding of the ways in which music can naturally support children’s social and emotional learning in the early childhood years.

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Lili M. Levinowitz, Ph.D. is Professor Emeritus of Music Education at Rowan University. She is the coauthor of the early childhood music and movement program, Music Together, and Director of Research for Music Together Worldwide. Dr. Levinowitz is considered a national authority on early childhood music and is actively involved in teaching very young children as well as presenting at national and international music education and early childhood education conferences. Her articles appear frequently in professional journals and popular magazines. She received her M.M. and Ph.D. from Temple University, and her B.M. from Westminster Choir College.

TEACH via Distance Learning – a Copyright Guide 
by Tooshar Swain, Rob Edwards, and James Weaver

Passed in 2002, the TEACH Act allows for distance learning to occur over multiple types of platforms. This webinar will explore the legal best practices in using the TEACH Act to support music education in distance learning environments.

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Tooshar Swain Rob Edwards James Weaver

Tooshar Swain serves as Public Policy Advisor for the National Association for Music Education (NAfME). In his role, Tooshar focuses on ESSA implementation, higher education policy, and other policies aimed at promoting music education in underserved areas. Prior to Joining NAfME, Tooshar most recently served as Policy and Communications Director for congressional candidate Micah Edmond in Virginia’s 8th Congressional District. Tooshar also served as Deputy Policy Director for Rick Santorum’s 2012 presidential campaign, focusing on economic policy.  Additionally, Tooshar spent five years at the Biotechnology Industry Organization (BIO) where he developed and advocated for tax and financial services policy supporting the biotech industry. Tooshar also spent four years on Capitol Hill serving as a policy staffer on tax issues. As the husband of a school teacher, Tooshar understands the vital role that music education plays in a child’s life. He is thrilled to be serving such a worthy cause that touches the lives of students across our country

Rob Edwards  joined the policy staff at the National Association for Music Education (NAfME) in 2018, contributing content expertise to a broad range of association work across advocacy, professional development, and research. His areas of focus include federal policy, communications, and program management. Prior to joining NAfME staff, Rob taught music as a band director in his home state of Arkansas. 

Dr. James Weaver is the Director of Performing Arts and Sports for the National Federation of High School State Associations. As the director of performing arts and sports Dr. Weaver oversees student participation, professional development, and awareness of performing arts activities throughout the nation’s 19,500+ high schools. He works to create partnerships with national arts organizations to create a robust advocacy network that impacts music, speech, debate, theatre, and academic competitions for all schools, and to increase access to these programs in underserved student populations. James has been a teacher and administrator at the district, state, and national level.

Fostering Community in a Virtual World
by Jace Saplan and Dean Luethi

We are pivoting. We are virtual. We are distanced. We are relearning and unlearning. 2020 has called us to navigate our craft in unfamiliar waters. However, our responsibility to uplift and connect our choral communities remains the same and is now more important than ever. Join us as we take a breath and realign ourselves to the infinite possibilities in building community, fostering safe relationships, championing empathetic spaces, and facilitating innovative artistry within our choral classrooms.

Jace Saplan Dean Luethi
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Dr. Jace Saplan is the director of choral activities at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa where he oversees the graduate program in choral conducting and conducts the UH Chamber Singers. He is also the artistic director of Nā Wai Chamber Choir, a vocal ensemble in residence at the University of Hawaiʻi that specializes in the propagation, preservation, and innovation of Hawaiian choral music. Dr. Saplan’s research focuses on decolonizing the choral craft, intersectionality within choral pedagogy, and Native Hawaiian choral performance practice.

Dr. Dean Luethi is Director of Choral Activities, Director of the School of Music, and an Associate Professor at Washington State University. Prior to his work at WSU, Dean worked at the University of South Florida and was a public-school music teacher. He received his Doctor of Musical Arts degree in Choral Music from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, his Master of Music degree in Choral Conducting from the University of South Florida in Tampa, and his Bachelor of Music degree in Vocal Music Education from the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay. Dean has presented research or performed in Austria, Cuba, China, Hawaii, India, Canada, and Poland. He is sought after as a guest conductor, adjudicator, and clinician and has been published in Choral Journal and Music Educators Journal. His recent set of books Aligning Voices: Exercises To Build Choral Musicianship is published by GIA. Dean enjoys amateur photography and lives with his wife, Ruth Boden, and their two cats.

Motivating Singers During COVID-19
by John Warren and Dean Luethi

Motivating Singers is a challenging part of the school choral program at all times, but especially now. Join John Warren and Dean Leuthi as they discuss strategies to encourage and inspire students to do their best whether rehearsing in person or virtually.

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John Warren

Dean Luethi
 

John F. Warren is Professor of Music and Director of Choral Activities at Syracuse University, where he conducts choirs, and teaches both graduate and undergraduate courses in conducting, choral literature, and rehearsal techniques. During his fifteen-year tenure, Syracuse choirs have performed at two state and three Eastern Region American Choral Director Association Conferences, including Rochester, New York in 2020, and toured throughout the Northeast United States and Canada, as well as Europe and South America. In 2017, the Syracuse University Singers performed for the National Conference of the National Collegiate Choral Organization in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. In 2015, Singers won the Grand Prix at the Florilegé Vocal de Tours in France, which entitled them to compete in Varna, Bulgaria in May 2016 as a finalist in the European Grand Prix for Choral Singing. Dr. Warren travelled back to Varna to judge the 2017 International Choir Competition. The choir’s first album, Mysteries and Wonders is available on ITunes and Amazon.com. Dr. Warren is a regular guest conductor with Symphoria, the professional orchestra of Syracuse, New York, having most recently conducted a program of music by J. S. Bach, C.P.E. Bach, and Mahler.

Dr. Dean Luethi is Director of Choral Activities, Director of the School of Music, and an Associate Professor at Washington State University. Prior to his work at WSU, Dean worked at the University of South Florida and was a public-school music teacher. He received his Doctor of Musical Arts degree in Choral Music from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, his Master of Music degree in Choral Conducting from the University of South Florida in Tampa, and his Bachelor of Music degree in Vocal Music Education from the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay. Dean has presented research or performed in Austria, Cuba, China, Hawaii, India, Canada, and Poland. He is sought after as a guest conductor, adjudicator, and clinician and has been published in Choral Journal and Music Educators Journal. His recent set of books Aligning Voices: Exercises To Build Choral Musicianship is published by GIA. Dean enjoys amateur photography and lives with his wife, Ruth Boden, and their two cats.

Creative Connections: Blending Technology and Creative Expression in your Virtual Music Rehearsals
by Christopher Schroeder

Christopher SchroederThrough the utilization of free web-based applications, music educators have the ability to create virtual lessons that will inspire and engage their students at all levels, whether they are learning remote or in-person. This 90-minute interactive session provides music educators, classroom teachers, and curriculum designers with tools and tips for building a virtual music ensemble that maintains social connections between students and unleashes their creative voices. Participants will take part in activities that demystify the music creation process, gain new ideas for incorporating academic curriculum in their music classes, and work with various music technology resources that teachers and students alike can begin using right away. Participants will be able to use their computer keyboards as a musical instrument, however the creative lessons and tips can be applied to any musical instrument.

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Christopher Schroeder is a Boston-based musician, educator, and arts advocate, Christopher Schroeder is a catalyst for social change through music and arts education. With over a decade of arts leadership and teaching experience, he has successfully established creative youth development programs and influenced music ecosystems within the Boston community and throughout the United States. Schroeder currently serves as the Executive Director of the Boston Music Project, Module Director for the Global Leaders Program and is a guest conductor and clinician with Conn Selmer, Inc. Former roles include Arts Coordinator with Boston Public Schools and Director of Community Engagement and Resident Artist at Conservatory Lab Charter School, Boston. Most recently, he was recognized as a Boston Future Leader by the Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce and a quarter-finalist for the 2019 Grammy Music Educator Award.

Best Practices for Online Choral Rehearsals
by Dean Luethi, Matthew Bumbach, and Timothy Michael Powell

In these unprecedented times music educators find themselves teaching in person, online, and various types of hybrid instructional methods. While online instruction is quite common for lecture style courses, very few music educators have been trained for synchronous or asynchronous ensemble instruction. Dr. Matthew Bumbach and Dr. Timothy Michael Powell will share best practices for online choral rehearsals. They will share strategies for online vocal warm-ups, music rehearsals, and putting together virtual choir videos using both established and cutting edge digital tools.

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Dean Luethi Matthew Bumbach Timothy Michael Powell

Dr. Dean Luethi is Director of Choral Activities, Director of the School of Music, and an Associate Professor at Washington State University. Prior to his work at WSU, Dean worked at the University of South Florida and was a public-school music teacher. He received his Doctor of Musical Arts degree in Choral Music from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, his Master of Music degree in Choral Conducting from the University of South Florida in Tampa, and his Bachelor of Music degree in Vocal Music Education from the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay. Dean has presented research or performed in Austria, Cuba, China, Hawaii, India, Canada, and Poland. He is sought after as a guest conductor, adjudicator, and clinician and has been published in Choral Journal and Music Educators Journal. His recent set of books Aligning Voices: Exercises To Build Choral Musicianship is published by GIA. Dean enjoys amateur photography and lives with his wife, Ruth Boden, and their two cats.

Matthew Bumbach is known for heartfelt choral programming that engages singers and audiences alike. He uses choral performance to develop the whole person and equip students with the tools to think deeply, create imaginatively, and lead transparently. To achieve this, he focuses not only on quality performance that is culturally informed and carefully polished, but an ethical path to excellence. Bumbach works to create an inclusive environment that focuses on equity and justice so that all students can fulfill their potential. Since 2017, Dr. Bumbach has served as assistant professor and Director of Choirs at South Dakota School of Mines and Technology in Rapid City, SD where he leads a thriving choral program of STEM students. He earned his Bachelors degree in Music Education from Stetson University where he studied with Duncan Couch and Jane Christensen, his Masters of Music degree from the University of South Florida where he studied with Richard Zielinski and Robert Summer, and his Doctor of Musical Arts degree from the University of Miami Frost School of Music where he studied with Karen Kennedy and Coreen Duffy.

Timothy Michael Powell is a conductor, composer, and educator – but not always in that order. He has been called “a skilled composer who understands the voice in all stages of development” by New York Concert reviews. His compositions eclectically span stylistic genres, and include multiple premieres at prestigious venues like Carnegie Hall and Lincoln Center. He is published by Hal Leonard, Gentry, Alliance, Zintzo, Musica Russica, MorningStar, and MusicSpoke. As a nationally recognized music educator, Timothy has taught at all levels of music education, including sacred children and youth choirs, public 6-12, collegiate, community, and adult sacred ensembles. Timothy was one of only 25 teachers named a Semi-finalist for the 2016 Grammy Music Educator Award, and won the American Prize in Choral Performance in 2012. He was a 1999 National Choristers Guild Scholar, and a 2002 Fulbright Scholar to Bulgaria. He is active as a festival clinician and adjudicator. His scholarly activities include research into emerging digital publishing and rehearsal platforms and the life and works of Dobri Hristov, the “Father of Bulgarian Choral Music.” Since 2016, he has authored the Sacred Music Choral Reviews column for the ACDA Choral Journal. Timothy holds a DMA in Conducting from the University of South Carolina and his Bachelors and Masters degrees with honors from Belmont University. He enjoys active memberships in ASCAP, Pi Kappa Lambda, NAfME, CCCO, and ACDA. www.TimothyMichaelPowell.com

Do You Want To Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month In Your Music Class?
by Ramon Rivera and Jacob Scherr

Learn how NAfME members Ramon Rivera and Jacob Scherr of Mount Vernon High School Music Department in Washington State held a school-wide Hispanic Heritage Month Celebration at their school that included the whole music department. Mr. Rivera and Mr. Scherr will host a LIVE zoom presentation and share how Hispanic Heritage Month impacted the music department and help increase student engagement. They will share many video resources that you can use in your classroom. They will also show you how the Mount Vernon High School music students can cross over to different music groups and be part of the band, Mariachi orchestra, and choir at the same time.

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Click here to view the PowerPoint document.
 
Ramon Rivera Jacob Scherr

 

 

From handwritten thank you notes from parents and students to being honored by the Speaker of the House, Ramon Rivera has been recognized as being an innovative leader and pioneer in cultural arts and has received numerous awards and accolades during his teaching career. He is currently the Mount Vernon School District Mariachi Program Director in Mount Vernon, Washington. He currently teaches 6 Mariachi and Folklorico classes with a total enrollment of over 200 students grades 6-12. Mr. Rivera also has written five published blogs for NAFME about Mariachi Education led Mariachi Education workshops for many companies and universities. 

Jacob Scherr is the Fine and Performing Arts Department chair at Mount Vernon High School, a 4A school with an enrollment of 2000 students, 60 miles north of Seattle where one third of the school is in the music program. He recently completed his term as president of the San Juan Music Educators Association. Mr. Scherr lives in Mount Vernon with his wife Annie, a private piano teacher and accompanist, and their two children Brennan and Lydia. A passionate educator, Jacob Scherr has been the director of bands and orchestras at Mount Vernon High School in Washington State since the fall of 2009. Alongside his co-director Omar Ordóñez, Mr. Scherr has been involved in every aspect of Mount Vernon High School’s Instrumental Department; in addition to directing the school’s bands, jazz bands and orchestras, he has instructed courses in Music Theory, led the Bulldog Marching Band, and founded the MVSD Mariachi program. Mr. Scherr’s ensembles have performed for the KPLU School of Jazz Recording Projects, at Washington Music Educators Conferences, and recently made their Carnegie Hall debut performing at the National Band and Orchestra Festival. Mr. Scherr immensely enjoys his involvement with music organizations having given presentations at the 2010, 2015, 2017, 2018 and 2019 WMEA and NAfME-NW conferences. Mr. Scherr graduated with a degree in Music Education from Western Washington University in 2009 and later graduated with his Master’s in Conducting from the American Band College of Sam Houston State University. He is an active performer, currently serving as assistant conductor with the Skagit Symphony. In 2008, Mr. Scherr co-founded the Whatcom Wind Ensemble, a community band located in Bellingham, Washington. In 2019, Mr. Scherr had the honor of being named Music Director for the prestigious Washington Wind Symphony

Conversations about Choral Tone
by John Stafford and Dean Luethi

For this webinar, Dean Luethi and John Stafford will discuss the schools of traditional choral tonal quality and how this information applies to commercial music/vocal jazz ensembles. They will share their experiences with teaching tone quality with traditional choirs and explain their observations about what they have learned and applied to both our traditional and commercial ensembles.

Click here to view a recording of the webinar.
 
John Stafford Dean Luethi

 

John Stafford II is currently Associate Professor of Music, Director of Choral Activities, and Co-Coordinator of the Music Department at Kansas City Kansas Community College. Professor Stafford was a 2015 recipient of the John & Suanne Roueche Excellence Award for outstanding teaching and leadership at the community college level. He has also received two teaching awards from KCKCC for Recruitment and Teaching Excellence. He was previously appointed at Millikin University, Eastern Illinois University, and Danville Area Community College teaching composition, theory, orchestration, history, and vocal jazz. He holds degrees from Millikin University (music business), Bowling Green State University (composition), and has done additional doctoral studies at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (choral conducting). Among his professional activities, Professor Stafford serves as the Jazz Chair of the Kansas Choral Directors Association and Commercial/Contemporary Music Chair of the Southwestern Division of the American Choral Directors Association; he is also a member of National Association for Music Educators, Jazz Educators Network, and American Choral Directors Association. Since 2014, Prof. Stafford has served as the Choral Director of Community Christian Church (architecture by Frank Lloyd Wright) in Kansas City, MO. He also currently serves at the Artistic Director of the m-pact Vocal Festival at KCKCC.

Dr. Dean Luethi is Director of Choral Activities, Director of the School of Music, and an Associate Professor at Washington State University. Prior to his work at WSU, Dean worked at the University of South Florida and was a public-school music teacher. He received his Doctor of Musical Arts degree in Choral Music from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, his Master of Music degree in Choral Conducting from the University of South Florida in Tampa, and his Bachelor of Music degree in Vocal Music Education from the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay. Dean has presented research or performed in Austria, Cuba, China, Hawaii, India, Canada, and Poland. He is sought after as a guest conductor, adjudicator, and clinician and has been published in Choral Journal and Music Educators Journal. His recent set of books Aligning Voices: Exercises To Build Choral Musicianship is published by GIA. Dean enjoys amateur photography and lives with his wife, Ruth Boden, and their two cats.

The Power of Story in Song: Communicating Your Message
by Dean Luethi

As choral directors we continue to develop the skills necessary to train our singers to sing with aesthetic intent. No matter the ability level, no matter the grade level, no matter the size, all choirs have the goal of aesthetic intention. That is, we want our audiences to be moved in particular ways through our performance. The choir’s ability to move our audiences is limited by their own ability to be aesthetically moved. Over the course of an 8-week rehearsal period our singers speak, sing, repeat, parse out, batch, and scrutinize each word of the repertoire. After time we experience “message fatigue;” we are no longer moved by the words. As conductors we must enable our students to, once again, feel the magic of the poetry. This webinar will engage participants in a method to enable our singers to deepen and strengthen their understanding of the text

Click here to view a recording of the webinar.
Click here to view the PowerPoint document.
 

 

Dr. Dean Luethi is Director of Choral Activities, Director of the School of Music, and an Associate Professor at Washington State University. Prior to his work at WSU, Dean worked at the University of South Florida and was a public-school music teacher. He received his Doctor of Musical Arts degree in Choral Music from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, his Master of Music degree in Choral Conducting from the University of South Florida in Tampa, and his Bachelor of Music degree in Vocal Music Education from the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay. Dean has presented research or performed in Austria, Cuba, China, Hawaii, India, Canada, and Poland. He is sought after as a guest conductor, adjudicator, and clinician and has been published in Choral Journal and Music Educators Journal. His recent set of books Aligning Voices: Exercises To Build Choral Musicianship is published by GIA. Dean enjoys amateur photography and lives with his wife, Ruth Boden, and their two cats.

The Rehearsal Grid: A Systematic Approach to Planning Repertoire and Rehearsals
by Dean Luethi

The rehearsal grid is a tool to help you organize your rehearsals, plan efficient use of your time, and ensure you have enough rehearsal to prepare your literature. The grid is an effective means to plan most of your semester while still remaining agile. It can provide insight to effectively use your time toward upcoming goals and to plan far enough ahead that you will never be caught off-guard by a looming performance. During this webinar we’ll discuss the uses of the grid, how to put one together, and offer a template to create your own!

Click here to view a recording of the webinar
 

Click here to access the Rehearsal Grid Template and the Rehearsal Plan Template.

 

Dr. Dean Luethi is Director of Choral Activities, Director of the School of Music, and an Associate Professor at Washington State University. Prior to his work at WSU, Dean worked at the University of South Florida and was a public-school music teacher. He received his Doctor of Musical Arts degree in Choral Music from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, his Master of Music degree in Choral Conducting from the University of South Florida in Tampa, and his Bachelor of Music degree in Vocal Music Education from the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay. Dean has presented research or performed in Austria, Cuba, China, Hawaii, India, Canada, and Poland. He is sought after as a guest conductor, adjudicator, and clinician and has been published in Choral Journal and Music Educators Journal. His recent set of books Aligning Voices: Exercises To Build Choral Musicianship is published by GIA. Dean enjoys amateur photography and lives with his wife, Ruth Boden, and their two cats.

International Coalition of Performing Arts Aerosol Study Round 2

Click here to view a recording of the webinar

 

Dr. James Weaver is the Director of Performing Arts and Sports for the National Federation of High School State Associations. As the director of performing arts and sports Dr. Weaver oversees student participation, professional development, and awareness of performing arts activities throughout the nation’s 19,500+ high schools. He works to create partnerships with national arts organizations to create a robust advocacy network that impacts music, speech, debate, theatre, and academic competitions for all schools, and to increase access to these programs in underserved student populations. James has been a teacher and administrator at the district, state, and national level.

 

 

                                     Teaching Elementary and Early Childhood Music in the Time of COVID-19
 
by Karen Salvador and Rob Lyda
 

Music is important in children’s lives and a crucial part of their well-rounded education. In this webinar, Rob Lyda and Karen Salvador will share NAfME suggested guidelines for elementary and early childhood music teaching in-person and online. In addition to suggesting limits to prevent virus spread, they will focus on ideas for what teachers CAN try. They’ll provide time for participants to share suggestions and ask questions—the resources they share are living documents and will be updated after this conversation. 

Click Here to view the recording
 

    

Karen Salvador

Rob Lyda                 

 

 

Karen Salvador is Assistant Professor of Music Education at Michigan State University, where she teaches undergraduate and graduate courses and directs the early childhood music programs at the MSU community music schools. She is a past president of Michigan’s MEA, and currently serves as president of the NAfME North Central Division. Her research explores how music educators create inclusive and responsive instruction, particularly in early childhood and elementary settings. She will host the Early Childhood Music and Movement Association’s Biennial International Convention at MSU this summer. 

Rob Lyda is the music teacher at Cary Woods Elementary in Auburn, AL. He has completed certification studies in Kodály, World Music Drumming, TI:ME, and is an Orff Schulwerk certified teacher. Currently, he serves as Chair of the NAfME Council for General Music Education and President-Elect of the Alabama MEA.

  Smithsonian Folkways Learning Pathways: A New Way to Deeply Engage Students with Music Online
 
 
Smithsonian Folkways Learning Pathways is the latest initiative in a long line of educational resources from the record label, designed to facilitate learning music and learning through music online. Learning about, appreciating, playing and creating music can benefit children’s lives, and help them navigate the complex world around them. The Smithsonian Folkways Learning Pathways are designed to do just that: engaging, thematic, integrated, flexible and attractively designed. These authoritative and customizable journeys of discovery place recordings from the rich and diverse Smithsonian Folkways collection and other primary sources from the Smithsonian Institution at the center of the educational experience. In this way, they provide targeted, high-quality educational materials at no cost to learners across all levels of education, with a specific focus on students enrolled in Title I schools and other under-resourced educational environments.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Huib Schippers music school founderHuib Schippers has a thirty-year history of innovative projects and publications in music education. He founded the Amsterdam World Music School (1990-1997), developed the Rotterdam World Music & Dance Centre (1996-2003), and led the Queensland Conservatorium Research Centre (2003-2015), before bringing a new focus on education as Director and Curator of Smithsonian Folkways Recordings from 2016 to 2020. His monograph Facing the Music (Oxford University Press, 2010) is used by music educators on five continents. 

 

 

 

 

Patricia Shehan Campbell SmithsonianPatricia Campbell teaches undergraduate and graduate courses at the interface of Ethnomusicology and Music at the University of Washington, including music for children, world music pedagogy, and ethnographic research in music. She has chaired the programs in Ethnomusicology and Music Education, establishing the BA in Ethnomusicology degree and developing studies in music and community. 

 

 

 

 

Ty-Juana Taylor educatorTy-Juana Taylor is a musician, educator, and researcher who has advocated for children’s rights and education for over a decade. With a PhD in ethnomusicology and a master’s in social welfare, she has worked with several organizations, locally and internationally, to create and implement diverse and inclusive programming, and educational curricula to better engage students from a variety of backgrounds and experiences. 

 

 

 

Jennifer Mellizo general music teacherJennifer Mellizo has been teaching K-8th grade music in public schools for the past twenty years. She holds a MA in music education and a PhD in Curriculum and Instruction. She was a 2014 Wyoming Arch Coal Teacher of the Year, the 2016 Albany County School District Teacher of the Year, and recently received a 2020-2021 Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program Award to Spain. 

 

 

 

Logan Clark Smithsonian FolkwaysLogan Clark has been the Executive Assistant for Smithsonian Folkways Recordings for three years. She has a PhD in ethnomusicology from the University of California, Los Angeles, where she researched Guatemalan Indigenous migrant communities and the marimba and taught classes in introductory ethnomusicology and Latin American music.